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How fast fashion adds to the world's clothing waste problem (Marketplace)
 
22:24
Fast fashion is a major contributor to the world's clothing waste problem. Many of us give our old clothes to charity or drop them in a store take-back bin, but you might be surprised to learn most of it is sold and can end up in the landfill. To read more: http://cbc.ca/1.4493490 »»» Subscribe to CBC News to watch more videos: http://bit.ly/1RreYWS Connect with CBC News Online: For breaking news, video, audio and in-depth coverage: http://bit.ly/1Z0m6iX Find CBC News on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1WjG36m Follow CBC News on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1sA5P9H For breaking news on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1WjDyks Follow CBC News on Instagram: http://bit.ly/1Z0iE7O Download the CBC News app for iOS: http://apple.co/25mpsUz Download the CBC News app for Android: http://bit.ly/1XxuozZ »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» For more than 75 years, CBC News has been the source Canadians turn to, to keep them informed about their communities, their country and their world. Through regional and national programming on multiple platforms, including CBC Television, CBC News Network, CBC Radio, CBCNews.ca, mobile and on-demand, CBC News and its internationally recognized team of award-winning journalists deliver the breaking stories, the issues, the analyses and the personalities that matter to Canadians.
Views: 684505 CBC News
How economists think differently from other humans
 
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In economics, a theory has long prevailed that markets are based on people making rational choices. But behavioral economist Richard Thaler is seeking to prove that there is far more randomness to our financial decisions. Economics correspondent Paul Solman talks to Thaler to find out why we buy and to discuss Thaler’s new book, “Misbehaving.” View the full story/transcript: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6ZFN9Tx6xh-skXCuRHCDpQ
Views: 15070 PBS NewsHour
How computers threaten the jobs of mid-skilled workers | The Economist
 
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The digital revolution offers great advantages but it also threatens the jobs of low and mid-skilled workers. As computers become smarter, so too must humans. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2v5mUik Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2v2vj63 Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2v7sVey Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2v1JFUm Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2uYEapk Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2v2M0yq
Views: 91430 The Economist
Wooden skyscrapers could be the future for cities | The Economist
 
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Wooden skyscrapers are an ambitious and innovative solution to the problems posed by urbanisation. Not only are they faster to build, they have smaller carbon footprints than high-rises made of concrete and steel. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2GCblkl By 2050 the world’s population is expected to soar to almost 10 billion people and two-thirds of us will live in cities. Space will be at a premium. High-rise offers a solution. But concrete and steel – the materials we currently use to build high – have a large carbon footprint. An answer might lie in a natural material we’ve used for millennia. Throughout history buildings have been made of wood. But it has one major drawback. It acts as kindling. Fire destroyed large swathes of some of the world’s great cities. But by the early twentieth century, the era of modern steelmaking had arrived. Steel was strong, could be moulded into any shape and used to reinforce concrete. It allowed architects to build higher than ever before. So why, after more than a century of concrete and steel, are some architects proposing a return to wood? Concrete and steel are costly to produce and heavy to transport. Wood however can be grown sustainably and it’s lighter than concrete. And crucially, as trees grow, they absorb carbon dioxide from the air, locking it into the timber. One study showed that using wood to construct a 125-metre skyscraper could reduce a building’s carbon footprint by up to 75% Regular timber isn’t malleable like steel or concrete, and isn’t strong enough to build high. But engineers have come up with a solution. It’s called cross-laminated timber, or CLT for short. CLT is light and it’s comparable in strength to concrete and steel. But how does it cope when burnt with a high heat source? London architects Waugh Thistleton are already designing buildings with this new kind of timber. Andrew and his colleagues designed Britain’s first high-rise wooden apartment block and have recently completed the world’s largest timber-based building. Behind these bricks is a timber core, made from more than 2000 trees, sourced from sustainable forests. And this London practice is not alone in advocating the use of CLT. Ambitious wooden high-rise buildings are also being constructed in Scandinavia, central Europe and North America. As yet, nobody has used CLT to build beyond 55 metres. But Michael Ramage’s research centre in Cambridge, working with another London practice, has proposed a concept design of a 300-metre tower, that could be built on top of one of London’s most iconic concrete structures – the Barbican. Making that jump in height will be a difficult sell. The cost of building wooden skyscrapers is largely unknown, but those costs could be reduced by prefabricating large sections of buildings in factories. And city-dwellers will need to be persuaded that CLT does not burn like ordinary wood. As an attractive, natural material, wood is already popular for use in low buildings. If planners approve, it could rise to new heights. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2GCbm7T Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2GCbnIZ Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2GAXgUa Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2GAXhrc Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2GAXivg
Views: 690614 The Economist
The struggles for independence and the impact of redrawing borders | The Economist
 
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From Catalonia to Kurdistan and Quebec, many people are demanding independence. What does it take to transform a cultural identity into a nation-state? And what is the impact? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2zpWFnB The number of countries in the United Nations has grown over the decades – from 51 states in 1945 to 193 today. Many more places want to become independent. But national governments almost always oppose secession. Catalonia’s parliament declared independence from Spain in October 2017 following a referendum deemed illegal by the central authorities in Madrid. Spain dismissed the region’s government, and decreed that a fresh election should be held. Catalan politicians leading the independence movement could be jailed for decades if found guilty of rebellion and sedition. The autonomous Kurdish region in Iraq also held a recent independence referendum. It outraged the government in Baghdad and neighbouring countries, which also have Kurdish minorities. The Baghdad government claimed the independence referendum was illegal and seized back the lands Kurds had taken beyond their region. The desire for secession is nothing new. There are estimated to be more than than 8000 ethno-cultural groups in the world. With many independence movements demanding that their homelands be recognised as countries. Jean-Claude Juncker, the president of the European Commission, said that if every region had its way, the EU would become unmanageable. So who gets to form a state? There are no clear international rules. The 1933 Montevideo Convention declared that a region needs 4 things to become a state: - a permanent population - a defined territory - a government - and the capacity to enter into relations with other states. But these are only guidelines. Ideally a region would also meet other conditions, such as: - show that a clear majority have freely chosen independence - respect its own minorities - have a viable state - and settle terms with the state it leaves and its neighbours In practice, all these conditions are hard to meet. Taiwan is a modern, democratic state in all but international law. It’s an island off the south-eastern coast of China which has its own constitution, functions as an independent state, has democratically elected leaders, and was the first place in Asia to rule in favour of gay marriage. Per head it’s around three times richer than mainland China. But China regards Taiwan as a renegade province. It insists that no country can have diplomatic ties with both itself and Taiwan. Only 19 countries, plus the Vatican, officially recognise it. Somaliland is another region seeking to be recognised as a country. The semi-desert territory on the coast of the Gulf of Aden declared independence from Somalia in 1991. It has its own government, police force and currency. But no foreign government recognises it. Perhaps for good reason. To recognise Somaliland would encourage other separatists in the region. It would undermine the already-weak federal government of Somalia. And it would probably lead to war. There have only been two major changes to African borders since the 1960s and neither is a success story. Eritrea declared independence from Ethiopia in 1993. Today the country has a despotic government and its people are mired in abject poverty. In 2011 South Sudan seceded from Sudan, making it the world’s newest country. Soon after South Sudan formed civil war broke out displacing 2.2 million people. Although a ceasefire was signed in 2015, the country lies in ruins - plagued by hyper-inflation, famine and violence. Independence has a romantic ring. Many sympathise with the demand for freedom. But redrawing borders is dangerous, and often causes as many problems as it solves. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2zpaHWN Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2zpaJ0R Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2zpaKBX Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2zpaL8Z Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2zpWHMf
Views: 971315 The Economist
Saudi Arabia: open for tourists | The Economist
 
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Saudi Arabia is spending half-a-trillion dollars on coastal resorts and an entertainment complex to try and attract more tourists. It's part of the crown prince's plan to diversify the country's economy away from oil. Will it work? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2v5Oqtz Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2v5g0XV Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2v5Os4F Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2v3KXLZ Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2v1nLOm
Views: 454705 The Economist
Putin's games with the West | The Economist
 
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As presidential elections take place in Russia, chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov talks about the games President Putin is playing with the West. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2GBpCOs Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2GDXPxf Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2GBpEpy Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2GAgvxK Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2GBpEWA Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2GBpFtC
Views: 350627 The Economist
Why is chicken so cheap? | The Economist
 
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People eat 65 billion chickens every year. It is the fastest-growing meat product. Yet pound for pound the price of chicken has fallen sharply. How has this happened? Read more about Chickenomics here: https://econ.st/2Wtp04o Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Chickens are the most populous bird on the planet. There are 23 billion of them at any given time - that's ten times more than any other bird. It's by far the fastest growing meat product but pound for pound the price of chicken has fallen sharply. How has this happened? This farm is at the forefront of a technology revolution that has drastically changed chicken farming. It's run by David Speller who's pioneered the use of CCTV and CO2 monitors in chicken sheds. Along with his own farm, he works as a consultant overseeing the raising of around 3 million chickens in the UK. Chickens were first domesticated over 8,000 years ago but it wasn't until the 1940s that major efforts were made to create a super breed. The chicken of tomorrow competition in America would change chickens forever. Today the lifecycle of broilers, chickens that are bred purely for their meat, is entirely preordained. They grow faster and bigger than ever before and they can only live supported by human technology. Chickens have changed so quickly they are now four times the size they were in the 1950s. A barnyard chicken can live up to 10 years showing the huge evolutionary change the broilers have undergone. But selective breeding on a global scale comes at a cost. If the chickens live beyond their planned life they develop huge medical problems. And there are concerns the chicken industry is relying on an increasingly small gene pool. Keeping chickens in battery cages was banned in the EU in 2012 but some people want to create better lives for broiler chickens. Free-range birds have more access to open air runs, while organic chickens are typically free from antibiotics, hormones and other synthetic chemicals. Organic chickens get to live the longest - 81 days compared to intensively reared birds which live between 35 and 40 days. Free-range chickens get the most access to open air runs but when it comes to living space, organic and free-range fair far better than intensively reared birds where as many as 17 adult birds live in a single square metre. Organic farming might offer animals a greater quality of life but consumers are largely driven by cost and in an average UK supermarket, an intensively reared chicken cost several times less than its free-range or organic cousins. Over 95% of broiler chickens are intensively reared in the UK. Organic and free-range chickens make up the rest. For as long as shoppers want cheap and plentiful chicken, they will continue to be bred ever more intensively. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 1893929 The Economist
Fast Fashion’s Effect on People, The Planet, & You | Patrick Woodyard | TEDxUniversityofMississippi
 
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Mindful business: While working for a microfinance firm in Trujillo, Peru, Patrick was introduced to the broken Peruvian footwear industry made up of over 100,000 shoemakers who possess remarkable talent yet lack access to consistent work, fair-wages, and brand access to established international markets. Having had extensive exposure to such potential juxtaposed with a lack of access in other developing countries, Patrick developed a vision to push the fashion industry in a new direction by serving as one of the first fashion brands to deliver a superior yet ethically-produced product to consumers. Patrick is the Co-Founder & CEO of Nisolo. Patrick graduated from the Croft Institute for International Studies and Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College at the University of Mississippi. His experience using business as a force for good has led him across the globe ranging from Kenya and Uganda to Argentina and Peru. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 61052 TEDx Talks
A softer Brexit is a better Brexit | The Economist
 
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Enter the Economist #OpenFuture contest: A minute to change the world. See more here: https://goo.gl/FU4YL4 The Brexit vote took place two years ago. But when Britons voted to leave the EU they had no say in what sort of Brexit they wanted. It has become clear that a softer Brexit is better, and Britain need only look to Norway to see why. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2tk2YnG Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2tk2YUI Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2tk2ZrK Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2tlqm4f Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2tlqmBh Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2tk31zS
Views: 72512 The Economist
Why does time pass? | The Economist
 
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The equations of physics suggest time should be able to go backwards as well as forwards. Experience suggests, though, that it cannot. Why? And is time travel really possible? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Why does time pass? It is a question so profound that few people would even think to ask it. Yet its effects are all around. Human beings live in a perpetual present, inexorably sealed off from the past, but moving relentlessly into the future. For most people, time seems to be something that is just out there. A thing ticking away in the background - fixed, immutable. Time seems to go in one direction and in one direction only. But physicists see it much differently. One of the great minds who changed the way science thinks about time was Albert Einstein. In 1905 he published his special theory of relativity. In it he demonstrated that time passes differently in different places depending on how those places are moving with respect to one another. Einstein showed that the faster one travels the slower time goes for the traveler. At the speeds at which humans move this is imperceptible. But for someone traveling on a spaceship at speeds close to that of light, time would slow down compared with its passage for people on earth. There was another important aspect of Einstein's theory which he didn't even realize when he published it. That time was woven into the very fabric of space itself. Einstein used this insight to help develop his general theory of relativity which incorporated gravity. He published it in 1915. With the general theory of relativity he demonstrated that massive objects warped the fabric of space-time. It is this curvature that causes time to slow down near them. Time slows down in proportion to the gravitational pull of a nearby object so the effect would be strong near a black hole but milder near the earth. But even here it can be detected. Einstein's theories had to be taken into account when the GPS system was set up otherwise it would have been inaccurate. One scientist who puzzled over the directionality of time was Arthur Eddington, a 20th century astronomer who defined the concept of the arrow of time, based on observations made by the 19th century physicist Ludwig Boltzmann. The arrow of time is based on the second law of thermodynamics which says the disorder known as entropy increases with time. For example, a building left untouched will slowly decay into its surroundings. It will disintegrate into a more chaotic state but it is highly unlikely that the building will become more orderly over time - this is because there are many more ways for a system to be disorderly than orderly. There can be many ways for something to break for instance but only one way for it to be put back together again. A system will be less disordered in the past and more disordered in the future. This is the arrow of time. So how can the arrow of time be reconciled with Einstein's equations? If time can go forwards and backwards according to relativity does that mean it's possible to go backwards in time? The theory of relativity does allow time travel to the future. Einstein's theories do allow for the formation of wormholes in space. These are shortcuts that link otherwise distant places in the space-time continuum. Although wormholes are theoretically possible they're a highly implausible proposition. That's because the equations suggest enormous masses and energies would be required to create and manipulate one. What remains then is a mystery. Theory fails to forbid traveling backwards in time but practice suggests it might just as well be forbidden. For now it would appear the arrow of time cannot be reversed. No one knows why time passes but it seems that no matter how people look at it, it goes in one direction in one direction only. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Read our Tumblr: http://theeconomist.tumblr.com/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6
Views: 2628549 The Economist
How powerful is your passport? | The Economist
 
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Passports can tell you a lot about a country. Colour can be a statement of national identity, state religion, or international co-operation. But not all passports are equal. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2Gbhx2T Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2GeS3C1 Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2GaGL1x Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2GbhxzV Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2GaGM5B Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2GaGMCD
Views: 2012993 The Economist
The High Cost of Our Cheap Fashion | Maxine Bédat | TEDxPiscataquaRiver
 
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Do you know where your clothes come from? The apparel industry is one of the biggest violators of both the environment and human rights. In this compelling and information-packed talk, co-founder of Zady Maxine Bédat shows how you can take back the power of your wardrobe, and feel better in (and better about) your clothes. Maxine Bédat is the co-founder and CEO of Zady, a fashion brand and lifestyle destination creating a transparent and sustainable future for the $1.5 trillion apparel industry. Her background in international law and diplomacy, including serving as a legal clerk for the U.N., led her to found The Bootstrap Project, a non-profit organization that works with entrepreneurs in the developing world. For its work in sustainability, Zady was named one of the world’s “Most Innovative Companies” in retail by Fast Company and its creativity was recognized by Mashable, which called the company “the #1 business rocking content marketing.” Bédat serves on the Council of NationSwell, has spoken at some of the world’s leading conferences, including the WWD Apparel/Retail CEO Summit, and has been regularly featured as an expert by Bloomberg, Forbes, Business of Fashion, CNN and the Huffington Post. Bédat is a graduate of Columbia Law School. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 90476 TEDx Talks
How to prepare for the next global recession | The Economist
 
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A decade after the global recession, the world’s economy is vulnerable again. Ryan Avent, our economics columnist, considers how the next recession might happen—and what governments can do about it Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 1522748 The Economist
Fast fashion
 
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Dianne Buckner reports on concerns over the environmental footprint of the fashion business. »»» Subscribe to CBC News to watch more videos: http://bit.ly/1RreYWS Connect with CBC News Online: For breaking news, video, audio and in-depth coverage: http://bit.ly/1Z0m6iX Find CBC News on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1WjG36m Follow CBC News on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1sA5P9H For breaking news on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1WjDyks Follow CBC News on Instagram: http://bit.ly/1Z0iE7O Download the CBC News app for iOS: http://apple.co/25mpsUz Download the CBC News app for Android: http://bit.ly/1XxuozZ »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» For more than 75 years, CBC News has been the source Canadians turn to, to keep them informed about their communities, their country and their world. Through regional and national programming on multiple platforms, including CBC Television, CBC News Network, CBC Radio, CBCNews.ca, mobile and on-demand, CBC News and its internationally recognized team of award-winning journalists deliver the breaking stories, the issues, the analyses and the personalities that matter to Canadians.
Views: 4369 CBC News
The future of the car industry | The Economist
 
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Ride-hailing apps such as Uber, Ola and Lyft are not only challenging taxi drivers around the world, they are also disrupting the car industry as a whole as people prefer to hail a ride than buy their own set of wheels. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 The Disrupters is an original series exploring how major industries—from music and cars to hospitality—are currently being disrupted by the latest wave of digital innovation. As well as enjoying privileged access into the world biggest tech start ups we show how industry giants respond when faced with such tech-driven innovation. Do they adapt—or die? The name of Ola's founder and chief executive officer is spelled incorrectly in this video. It should be Bhavish Aggarwal. We are sorry for the error. June 1st, 2016. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Read our Tumblr: http://theeconomist.tumblr.com/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6
Views: 130327 The Economist
Was Karl Marx right? | The Economist
 
03:23
Karl Marx remains surprisingly relevant 200 years after his birth. He rightly predicted some of the pitfalls of capitalism, but his solution was far worse than the disease. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2FEY1tD Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2FE3sJB Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2FDEbiA Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2FHCzVe Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2FFx4Gi Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2FEbDWi
Views: 474455 The Economist
How to revive public healthcare | The Economist
 
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Britain's National Health Service is facing unprecedented challenges—70 years after it was first created. Lord Ara Darzi is a world-leading surgeon and a former British health minister. This is his prescription for nursing the NHS back to health. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2NlVzNZ Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2NlVBp5 Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2NlVDxd Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2NniBUG Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2NniCrI Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2NlVHNt
Views: 26198 The Economist
Cycling's speed secrets | The Economist
 
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In Olympic cycling the smallest of tweaks to the bike and the rider's position can make the difference between glory and failure. Discover how marginal gains have helped Great Britain's track cyclists repeatedly top the medal table. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Sponsored by DXC Technology. Few sports test the limits of professional athletes like cycling but it's not just human endurance on the track that delivers the winning formula. It's human ingenuity off it. In elite sport, the difference between success and failure is often the finest of margins. This is base camp for one of the most successful teams in global sport - Great Britain's track cyclists have topped the medals tables at the past three Olympic Games. And it's a team that keeps churning out winners. In a sport where races are decided by as little as one thousandth of a second, Emily and her teammates are obsessed with one thing - marginal gains. And one of the best places to find those tiny margins is on the bike. The teams key man for this is an aerodynamics expert and ex-Formula one motor racing engineer. Cambridge University professor of engineering, Tony Purnell, designed the world-renowned T5GB bike with manufacturer Cervélo. By dramatically reducing air resistance it helped the British team enjoy its most successful Olympics ever. All-important milliseconds were shaved off performance times by making the tiniest of design changes - even down to the chain. It's not just the bike where aerodynamic perfection is relentlessly pursued - it's also the person on it. The precise position of the rider can make all the difference. In 1996 Olympic gold medalist Chris Boardman broke the one-hour world record. By pioneering his legendary Superman position. Today this legacy lives on at the state-of-the-art Boardman Performance Center in Evesham England. Today Jamie is helping professional cyclist Dan Bigham decipher his optimum body posture for an upcoming Team Pursuit race in the wind tunnel. Dan is battling winds of over 60 kilometres per hour to simulate the drag conditions he'll face on the track. His performance and ultimately success could depend on a series of almost imperceptible tweaks to his position on the bike. By moving his hand slightly forward and adjusting the gap between them by just millimeters Dan speeds up by nearly half a second per kilometer. Come race day, subtle changes like this could add up to a big advantage for Dan's team. Cycling's reputation has been damaged by doping but its pursuit of legitimate marginal gains still sets the pace for many other disciplines. Britain's world-beating cyclists face ever more intense competition from rivals who are quickly learning how to innovate. The pursuit of marginal gains is about to get even more marginal In elite sport the difference between winning and losing often hangs on the smallest of margins. As coaches, teams and athletes press ever harder in pursuit of victory, this series reveals the latest innovative approaches they hope will keep them ahead. From data to design, science to psychology, discover what it takes to find the winning edge. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 259634 The Economist
Is the pope head of the world's most powerful government? | The Economist
 
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Is the pope head of the world's most powerful government? The pope represents over one billion people, his government has a permanent presence at the United Nations and he runs the oldest diplomatic service on earth. We asked the man behind the Vatican's foreign policy to explain how the world's smallest country could house the world's most influential government Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2G6zUG5 Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2G6zVK9 Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2G8KyfS Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2G8MEvS Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2G7lTrW Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2G5WIpA
Views: 162828 The Economist
The economics of immigration
 
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Immigration is the most divisive issue in the world. Lou takes a look at the topic from an economic perspective: How do immigrants impact the job market? Do they stymie growth, or contribute to it? Do they take more benefits then they pay into the system? SOURCES & FURTHER READING Peri on the economic impact of immigration https://clas.berkeley.edu/research/immigration-economic-benefits-immigration Borjas on the economic pros and cons of immigration https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/trump-clinton-immigration-economy-unemployment-jobs-214216 Camarota on the case against immigration https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2017-03-31/case-against-immigration The immigration economy (Council of Foreign Relations roundup) https://www.cfr.org/expert-roundup/immigration-economy CREDITS Writer: Louis Foglia Editor: m.cho Researcher: Dushyant Naresh Supervising Producer: Allison Brown Follow Beme on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bemenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/bemeapp Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/officialbeme/
Views: 57957 BEME News
Women and the Saudi revolution | The Economist
 
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Saudi Arabia is one of the most conservative countries in the world. But a social revolution has begun. The Economist's editor, Zanny Minton Beddoes takes a road-trip around Riyadh to examine what a more moderate Saudi would mean for its women, and the rest of the world. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2zc9nHO Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2zg5DVw Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2z9xI0Z Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2zg5FwC Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2zg5G3E Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2zbI6VU
Views: 203585 The Economist
Fashion Waste - Behind the News
 
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Australians love buying new clothes, but the latest trends might not always last long in your wardrobe. Those clothes can take decades to break down in landfill. So now some environmental groups say we should be buying better quality clothes and committing to them for longer. TEACHER RESOURCES (yr4 Geography & yr 3-6 Design and Tech) "Students will investigate the impact clothing waste has on the environment. They will also explore how clothing can be reused." http://www.abc.net.au/btn/resources/teacher/episode/20170509-fashionwaste.pdf BTN STORY PAGE http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s4663466.htm RELATED BTN STORY Upcycling Kids http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s4183196.htm Green Art http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3880235.htm
Views: 12107 Behind the News
Do we live in a multiverse? | The Economist
 
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It has long been thought that our universe is all there is, but it is possible we may live in just one of many. This is the second in our six-part series on unsolved mysteries in science. Read the accompanying article: http://www.economist.com/news/science-brief/21660968-our-second-brief-scientific-mysteries-we-ask-whether-world-might-make-more-sense. Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj When the ancients looked into the night sky they thought the heavens revolved around the earth and mankind. over the centuries this view has changed radically. We discovered we lived on a planet orbiting a star within the solar system and the solar system was found to be part of the Milky Way galaxy. Later we learned that our universe was filled with billions of other such galaxies - but could it be that we're committing the same error as our ancestors by thinking the universe contains everything there is? Could it be that we live in a multiverse? There are a number of different theories about what the multiverse could be. One proponent of the idea of the multiverse is Dr Tegmark of MIT. Dr Tegmark suggests a four fold classification of possible types of multiverse. The first type of multiverse is just an extension of what we already know our universe expanding into infinity rather than ending at the limits of our vision. We can look back almost to the beginning of time to the edge of the observable universe, but we can see no further. So the space beyond that distance known as the Hubble radius is literally out of sight. But that doesn't mean there isn't anything there. Because the expansion of the universe has stretched space, astronomers are able to see out to a distance of about 42 billion light years. How far things extend beyond this is unknown. If they stretch to infinity there could be numerous isolated universes cut off from one another by their own Hubble radius - depending on the observers vantage point. To understand the second type of multiverse in Dr Tegmark system it is first necessary to understand how the universe was formed and the theory of inflation. It was first conceived of by Alan Guth in 1979 and then later refined and expanded upon by Andrei Linde who had some key insights. This is one of the ideas of string theory which attempts to unify general relativity with quantum mechanics. The thinking is that all of the solutions produced by string theory that don't match up with what we can see in our own universe, may actually represent reality in other universes. The anthropic principle is the idea that our universe is fine-tuned to allow humans to live. A small fiddle with the strength of gravity for example and life as we know it would not exist - a coincidence that does not sit easily with scientists. The concept of a multiverse neatly addresses this problem within the infinite number of universes that could exist we are simply living in the one we are able to. In the third type Dr Tegmark multiverse in the first the laws of physics are the same from one to another. In this type though the component universes are separated not by distance but by time. At every moment within such a multiverse all of the possible futures allowed by the uncertainties of quantum mechanics actually happen. In the many worlds theory of the multiverse the entirety of the universe acts like the quantum photon, but instead of having two potential future states, every possible outcome would be manifested so our entire universe and everything within it, including you, would be constantly undergoing multiple visions into daughter universes - each with its own reality and future. Any given observer though would only see one outcome. In the final classification, the level 4 multiverse, Dr Tegmark proposes that all coherent mathematical systems describe a physical reality of some sort. Those different systems are of necessity different universes. What this last idea translates to in practice is hard to conceive of - it is more the province of metaphysics than physics, but the other three types of multiverse though they push the bounds of physical theory do not overstep them. Observational data supporting the theory of inflation have convinced some scientists that a multiverse is possible - but the idea is still controversial. It may be impossible to ever directly observe the multiverse but some scientists hope to eventually gather enough data supporting the theories that predict it to one day confirm its existence. If that were to happen, like the ancients before us, we would be given a whole new perspective on how the cosmos works and on our place in it. Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 1031396 The Economist
What will be the biggest stories of 2019? | Part Two | The Economist
 
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Augmented-reality surgery, moon landings and a battle for the soul of Europe will be major talking points in the year ahead. But what else will make our countdown for the top ten stories for 2019? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy What will be the biggest stories of the year ahead? 00:35 - 5 - Augmented-reality surgery 2019 will bring a whole new reality for some patients going under the knife, as surgeons use augmented reality headsets to help carry out operations. Doctors at St Mary's Hospital in London are pioneering the use of AR to improve skin graft surgery. It's hoped this technology will make surgery faster and safer for patients. Multiple images from CT scans are combined to make a 3D hologram which is superimposed onto the surgeons real world view. The AR headsets were developed from the technology used in a Microsoft games console but they now have life-saving applications. 02:30 - 4 Japan tackles tourism In September sports fans will turn their eyes to Japan as it hosts the Rugby World Cup. The tournament will be more than just a warm-up for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics it's central to a plan to transform the country's economy. The government hopes to boost the number of tourists to 40 million a year by 2020 - 25 percent more than in 2017. Currently around 85 percent of visitors to Japan are from Asia but it is now attracting more Western visitors with far more spending power. In preparation for this boom a taxi company in Tokyo has organized a competition to test drivers English. The winner early started learning English four years ago and he's seen a steady rise in foreign customers. The Japanese government also wants more foreigners to stay in the country. With famously low immigration rates and almost a third of citizens aged over 65, Japan is suffering from a dire labor shortage but legislation has been passed that will allow three hundred and forty-five thousand foreign workers in over the next seven years. But with the Japanese population shrinking by nearly four hundred thousand a year the country may need to welcome even more people from the rest of the world. 05:06 Testing Trump 2019 is set to be US president Donald Trump's most testing year yet when Democrats assume control of the House of Representatives and he comes under more scrutiny. Mr. Trump came to power promising to rid Washington DC of corruption and vested interests. But this could be the year the swamp really makes the president sweat. Top of the list for some Democrats is publishing the president's tax returns. But it won't just be his financial affairs under the spotlight - the real pressure on Mr. Trump in 2019 could come from the Muller investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. If the investigation supports serious allegations against the president then 2019 could be the year that the Democrats begin impeachment proceedings. But don't expect the Republican majority in the Senate to convict him or any charges to even make a dent in Mr. Trump's core support across the country So for Mr. Trump's political opponents the real focus in 2019 is likely to be on who they choose to run against him at the next presidential election. 07:46 - 2 Moon rush On the 20th of July the world will remember the moment 50 years ago when Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon. In 2019 there will be new entrants in the race to return to the moon. Israeli nonprofit organizations space il hopes it's Lander will be the first lunar expedition funded by private enterprise and other companies like Astrobotic in the US are also planning to get in on the action soon. Not to be outdone China's Lunar Lander should also touchdown in 2019, making it the first craft to land on the far side of the Moon - But there is more than just prestige at stake and it will no longer just be men taking giant leaps. 10:05 - 1 Battle for Europe The biggest story of 2019 won't be, as some might think, the UK's protracted divorce from the European Union. In 2019 a bigger broader upheaval is set to unfold across the continent ahead of the European parliamentary elections. Populist parties have shaken the traditional political order across the continent and are hoping to win more power than ever in the 2019 vote. It raises the multi-billion euro question what will all this mean for the EU's future. Some of its supporters hope that populist forces could ultimately push the EU into reforms which will save it and the continents prosperity. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 481827 The Economist
Fashion has a pollution problem -- can biology fix it? | Natsai Audrey Chieza
 
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Natsai Audrey Chieza is a designer on a mission -- to reduce pollution in the fashion industry while creating amazing new things to wear. In her lab, she noticed that the bacteria Streptomyces coelicolor makes a striking red-purple pigment, and now she's using it to develop bold, color-fast fabric dye that cuts down on water waste and chemical runoff, compared with traditional dyes. And she isn't alone in using synthetic biology to redefine our material future; think -- "leather" made from mushrooms and superstrong yarn made from spider-silk protein. We're not going to build the future with fossil fuels, Chieza says. We're going to build it with biology. Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED
Views: 62105 TED
Populism is reshaping our world | The Economist
 
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From the streets of Turin to Silicon Valley, people power is taking the world by storm. With frustrations rising and the old order apparently crumbling, who really has the answers? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 December 2016 Italy's populist opposition is shaking up the establishment. They're days away from a referendum that could spell the end for the Italian government and make it the latest domino in the toppling international order. Around the world populist leaders are connecting with voters fed up with politics as usual and exploiting anger at an establishment out of touch with ordinary people. But giving voice to people's frustrations is one thing, offering them real answers is quite another. Five Star's anti-establishment message is resonating with voters. It is now Italy's biggest opposition party. The country has been crippled by recession and stagnating wages. With rates of inequality among the highest in Europe many people feel left behind by globalization and let down by political leaders. Now the populists sense there may be an opportunity to bring those leaders down. A referendum on constitutional reform has become a vote of confidence in the ruling elite. Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has said he will resign if the country votes no. He's the latest politician to find himself in the firing line. Tonight, thousands of five-star supporters are gathering at a rally in Turin. Some are starting to ask what they might do with success. Beppe Grillo has vowed to get rid of political parties but he certainly knows how to start one. Grillo's success has come through impassioned charges against the corrupt elites and global forces he blames for Italy's woes but five stars leaders may soon have a harder note to hear. A question of how they would tackle unemployment and inequality. Two days after the rally Italians overwhelmingly voted no in the referendum. Prime Minister Renzi made good on his promise to stand down. It's another victory for populism as across the world charismatic leaders defy expectations. They're finding success selling deceptively simple answers to difficult questions. They almost always blame the failings of free trade and mass migration for rising inequality but is this the right target? Few cities are immune to the uneven impact of globalization. The latest venture from a San Francisco startup has the potential to turn one of America's most iconic industries on its head. Last year Uber paid $680 million for Otto, a company whose technology could fundamentally change trucking forever. It allows a truck to drive down a highway with nobody at the wheel. The company claims it could save the industry billions of dollars a year, reduce emissions by a third and eliminate the driver errors that cause up to 87% of truck crashes. But this bright sounding future has a dark side. A series of studies have found technology, not globalization, to be the biggest driver of inequality in developed countries. There were three and a half million people employed in trucking in America and with their industry seemingly the next in line for automation many face an uncertain future. As inequality grows in Western democracies, wealthy California has become one of the most economically unequal states in America as technology has displaced many lower skilled jobs. An alienated public turned on the establishment because it failed to provide answers. As some tech giants become as powerful as that establishment, it's a lesson they're starting to learn. So they're going back to school. For too many people in western democracies progress is still something that happens to other people. Wealth does not spread itself. An underclass appears beyond help, finding a way to reconnect with them and provide an alternative to populism will be at the top of the agenda for the political and business leaders of tomorrow THE AGENDA explores the defining questions of our time and seeks out the stories, solutions and the personalities who might just hold the answers. Discover the mould-breakers experimenting with new ways to approach some of the modern world's most fundamental issues; find out what happens when bold ideas and real life collide, and meet the leaders whose thoughts and actions are themselves helping to shape the agenda. Series One of The Agenda: People Power gets to grips with the rise of populism and what lies behind it. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 741152 The Economist
The wastefulness of "fast fashion" and how some in the industry are fighting back
 
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The number of fashion items produced around the world has doubled over the last two decades to more than 100 billion every year. More than 70% of that eventually end up in landfill. It's such a problem, cutting-edge designers are using more recycled material and major brands are pouring money into finding high-tech solutions. For more from ABC News, click here: http://www.abc.net.au/news/ Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/abcnews Like us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/abcnews.au Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://ab.co/1svxLVE Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/abcnews_au
Views: 2925 ABC News (Australia)
How could veganism change the world? | The Economist
 
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Interest in vegan food and its associated health benefits has been booming across the rich world. A global retreat from meat could have a far-reaching environmental impact. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy By 2050 the world's population could approach 10 billion - and around 60% more food could be needed to feed everyone. The environmental impacts of the food system are daunting its responsible for about a quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions and uses about 70% of all freshwater resources, and it occupies about 40% of the Earth's land surface. Food rated emissions could increase to 50 percent by 2050 and fill up the total emissions budget that we have in order to avoid dangerous levels of climate change. Interest in vegan food has been booming across the rich world. A major study has put the diet to the test - analyzing an imagined scenario in which the world goes vegan by 2050. If everybody went vegan by 2050 we estimated that food-related greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced by 3/4. Cows are the biggest emission contributors. Bugs in their digestive system produce methane and deforestation for their pasture releases carbon dioxide - these gases warm the planet. If cows were a country, they'd be the third largest greenhouse gas emitter. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 494107 The Economist
Where does your phone come from? | The Economist
 
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Apple is expected to announce its latest handset—the iPhone XS. Like all smartphones it will contain more than 70 chemical elements, which are mined from the Earth's crust in countries all over the world. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy The number of smartphone users globally is set to reach 2.5 billion by 2019. Around a third of the world's population will own one. Smartphones touch every element of our lives but did you know that they also connect nearly every element on the planet. In fact of the 118 elements on the periodic table 75 can be found inside a smartphone. These raw materials are extracted from the ground and shipped to refineries and factories in a truly global supply chain. Silicon, one of the most common elements in the Earth's crust, is used to make the billions of transistors in the chips that power your phone. Gold is used for electrical wiring, about 0.03g of it in each iPhone. Indium, another metal, is used to make touchscreens. But when it comes to batteries, lithium is one really key components and this element is only mined in a handful of countries. Until recently, Chile used to produce the most lithium but now Australia has the biggest market share. The Democratic Republic of Congo, a dangerously unstable country with a poor human rights record, produces more than half the world's cobalt, another crucial element in smartphone batteries. Smartphone makers are under pressure to ensure their cobalt is responsibly sourced. About 80% of the cobalt used in batteries is refined in China. Many so-called rare earth elements are also used in smartphones. In the screen, the speaker, and the motor that makes your phone vibrate. About 85% of rare earth elements are produced in China. Despite their name rare earth elements are not particularly rare but they are hard to extract without producing toxic and radioactive byproducts. Many of the elements used in smartphones are finite resources and have no functional substitutes. Rather than digging in the ground for the elements needed for new handsets it makes sense to extract them from old phones - but only about 10% of handsets are recycled now. So recycle your phone if you get a new one this year. Why? It is you might say, Elementary. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 63723 The Economist
The world in 2050: Megachange | The Economist
 
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Daniel Franklin, executive editor of The Economist and editor of "The World in..." examines megatrends across four main areas: "people", "life and death", "economy and business" and "knowledge", at The Economist's Ideas Economy: Innovation 2012 event in Berkeley, California. Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 49063 The Economist
War is in decline, but for how long? | The Economist
 
02:34
One hundred years after the end of the first world war, battle-related deaths have fallen worldwide. But flashpoints remain and new threats are looming. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 61566 The Economist
Discover Hyderabad | The Economist
 
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Hyderabad, India's fourth biggest city, is fast becoming one of the most exciting visitor destinations in the country. Its booming tech scene is attracting global attention and transforming this ancient city into a cosmopolitan hotspot. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Discover Colombo: https://youtu.be/4COeTrjB6hA Discover Buenos Aires: https://youtu.be/q0pMg6rvc0s Discover Miami: https://youtu.be/sCi4FBN-7dA Discover Oaska: https://youtu.be/cNIrkT3WB24 Discover London: https://youtu.be/mIEsgVd17v8 Once home to the richest man in the world and the center of the global diamond trade, Hyderabad is full of hidden gems - you just have to know where to find them. Three passionate locals are about to take you on a tour of their city, revealing the secret spots where you can experience the real Hyderabad. If you want to capture the vibrancy, colour and sounds of Hyderabad you’ll need to get up early just like the flower merchants of Gudimalkapur flower market. As flowers are an integral part of Indian life—this market attracts buyers and sellers from across the region. It's also a favourite spot for keen photographers. Saurabh has taken his love of photography one step further and now shares it with visitors by running photowalks. By joining Saurabh it's a chance to see this city and its people through a very different lens. So called ‘Cyberabad’ is the home to Hyderabad’s flourishing Tech and Startup community. The ambition is to create India’s answer to Silicon Valley—and it’s fast attracting a young cosmopolitan crowd. But when Srinivas has business visitors he doesn’t take them to the newest parts of town. He takes them to the oldest. The street markets of Charminar in the old city have been the beating heart of Hyderabad for four hundred years. This was the centre of the world's diamond and pearl industry during the time of the Nizam's who ruled over Hyderabad from 1724 to 1948. The diamond industry may have moved on, but the pearl trade is still alive and well giving the city its moniker "The City of Pearls", attracting buyers from around the world. Since arriving in Hyderabad 13 years ago Jonty decided to set up her own business taking people to the true heart of the city, and a place where most travelers never get to visit - the authentic Indian kitchen. Home dining is becoming very popular with travelers but here at Usha’s they don't just come to eat but to learn the secrets and skills of Hyderabadi home cooking. This is no five-star restaurant but it offers visitors an even rarer experience - the opportunity to really see how the locals do it. The Falaknuma Palace Hotel used to be the royal guest house for the richest man in the world Osman Ali Khan, the last Nizam ruler. For those in the know, tea here comes with a personal tour with the resident historian. At the top of Moala Ali Hill is a 16th century dargah - a Muslim shrine. The dargahs reputed healing properties turned it into a pilgrimage site and countless devotees climb the 500 steps to the top. But praying in Hyderabad isn’t all about quiet contemplation — it’s a chance to party too. And with over 50 religious festivals in the calendar year there’s always an opportunity to get involved. Every neighbourhood will hold its own festivities. And for Jonty, it’s the best way to immerse visitors in the Hyderabad street scene. It may seem overwhelming but If you want to properly appreciate these festivals, there’s only one thing for it - leap right in. Some of the most popular festivals last for up to eleven days. ___________________ Passport is an original travel series for the intellectually and culturally curious, exploring some of the most exciting city destinations in the world. The insiders’ guide to each city follows at the shoulder of three local characters as they reveal the experiences and places not covered in the guidebooks. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 160477 The Economist
How will people travel in the future? | The Economist
 
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From flying cars to pods that travel at over 1,000kph, revolutionary new ways to travel are being dreamed up by ambitious companies. But which pioneering visions are most likely to take off? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Hollywood movies have envisaged a future of hoverboards and flying cars - these imaginary machines might not be too far from reality. By 2030 a quarter of shared passenger miles traveled on America's roads could be in self-driving vehicles. It's believed eight out of ten people will be using Robotaxis in cities where available by 2035. There will also be more emphasis on sharing journeys. All this could reduce the number of cars on city streets by 60 percent, emissions by 80 percent, and road accidents by 90 percent. And then there are flying cars - or more accurately - passenger drones and helicopter hybrids. Uber is investing heavily in this technology. Los Angeles, Dallas, and some states in Australia could see test flights within a couple of years - but these cross city flights will require changes to air traffic control systems, which will probably take longer to develop than the flying vehicles themselves. Traveling across country could be far quicker too. China is leading the world in high-speed bullet trains that are capable of traveling over 400 kilometres per hour. By 2020, 80 percent of the country's major cities could be linked to the network. But for high-speed travel, the ambitious Hyperloop could leave bullet trains in the dust. It's an ambitious system in which pods move along tubes in a mere vacuum. The lack of air resistance means pods could reach speeds of over 1,000 kilometers per hour. Virgin wants to deliver a fully operational Hyperloop system by the mid-2020s. The company claims its Hyperloop pods could travel from Los Angeles to Las Vegas in 30 minutes. But the potential dangers of travel at such great speeds, and the cost, mean the Hyperloop will not be a reality for decades. In the air, the makers of supersonic jets are promising to slash travel times too. Arion wants to carry 12 passengers in luxury at 1.4 times the speed of sound - about 60% faster than typical aircraft today, and rival Boom hopes to be flying its supersonic airliner by 2023, carrying 55 passengers up to 2.2 times the speed of sound. Skeptics say these ideas are impractical and expensive, with many technical challenges to overcome. Despite this, tech and engineering companies are boldly taking up the challenges of passenger transit - promising to propel us into the future Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 153138 The Economist
An expert’s guide to negotiating Brexit | The Economist
 
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Britain has begun talks on leaving the European Union. The architect of Canada’s recent trade deal with the EU discusses the complexities of Brexit. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 It is crucial for Britain to negotiate a trade deal with the EU before it leaves the bloc in March 2019. One country that has successfully negotiated a deal with the EU is Canada. CETA is the biggest trade deal ever signed. Jason Langrish offers Britain some tips on how to negotiate such a deal. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 21135 The Economist
Where to invest in 2019? | The Economist
 
03:09
Where should you look to invest in 2019? Our capital-markets editor John O'Sullivan suggests the best strategy for the year ahead. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 162032 The Economist
The best place to be a woman? | The Economist
 
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In the battle for gender equality Iceland is leading the world. The tiny island is pioneering news ways to close the gender pay gap, root out stereotypes and get more mothers back to work. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Supported by Mishcon de Reya Today women around the globe have less access to power wealth and education than men - but one tiny island is leading the world in bridging these gaps. Iceland is pioneering ways to get more mothers back to work, to root out gender stereotypes, and to close the pay gap. Could Iceland inspire the world to solve one of its greatest problems? Iceland has topped gender equality rankings for nearly a decade. One of the secrets to their success? Start early. This kindergarten in the capital Reykjavik focuses on challenging extreme gender stereotypes before they take root in boys and girls. It's a mission that's led to the creation of 17 schools across this tiny country - all focused on developing a healthy balance of characteristics in both sexes. Girls and boys are separated to allow girls to nurture traits traditionally viewed as masculine, like being bold, independent, and taking risks. And boys are given time to learn traits traditionally viewed as feminine, like being more group oriented, empathetic, and caring - and the signs are that this is working. Research suggests that in later years children from this school have a greater understanding of gender equality when compared to children from other schools. Iceland is also promoting gender equality by encouraging fathers to share the childcare burden with mothers. In 2000, it introduced what is known as a daddy quota - three month statutory paternity leave. It's an allowance that goes much further than most other countries in the world. Here over 70% of fathers take up the full three months leave. Why? Because the state covers 80% of a salary during this period up to a cap of $4,600 a month. One beneficiary of this generous system is Egill Bjarnson who is looking after his son Valer. Egill believes the high cost of the daddy quota to taxpayers is justified because it helps get more women into work. But even in Iceland men are still paid nearly 6% more than women for similar work. This year Iceland became the first country in the world to pass legislation not just to expose but to tackle the gender pay gap. Companies with over 25 employees like Reykjavik Energy now have to prove they are paying men and women equally for similar jobs. Every job at the company must be measured against a set of criteria - this produces a score. For jobs with the same score workers must be paid the same. When Reykjavik Energy used this pay calculator the inequalities came into sharp and immediate focus. The company rectified this by raising the wages of its female employees. Critics of the law point out there will be significant financial consequences for companies as they rectify their pay inequalities - but many argue this is a necessary price to pay. Gender equality will be an ever more pressing challenge for wealthy countries across the world. Could the ambitious measures being tested in Iceland provide practical solutions? What are the forces shaping how people live and work and how power is wielded in the modern age? NOW AND NEXT reveals the pressures, the plans and the likely tipping points for enduring global change. Understand what is really transforming the world today – and discover what may lie in store tomorrow. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 253625 The Economist
Transforming cities with technology | The Economist
 
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Cities are growing faster than at any time in history, straining services and infrastructure. Technology-driven advances are at the forefront of solving this age-old problem Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 By 2050, two thirds of the world’s population will live in cities. Urbanisation is happening faster than at any time in human history. Globally, 900 million people are living in slums. Cities can’t add housing fast enough. Today, an estimated one billion vehicles are already bringing urban areas to a standstill. Cities consume three-quarters of the world’s energy each year and are responsible for around 50% of greenhouse gas emissions. These are challenges our cities have been facing for decades. But now some city leaders, businesses, and even citizens, are taking new approaches to tackling these old problems. They’re transforming their cities with technology. In Seoul, the use of data is seen as the key to tackling some of the big challenges of city life - like moving its people around. City workers here use sophisticated technology to understand and transform how the city - and its metro - can be run. The subway system transports 7 million people every day. It’s widely regarded as one of the best in the world. And the entire network from wheels to workers is driven by data. The speed and frequency of the trains can be constantly adjusted to keep everything running smoothly. “Smart” cameras measure how many passengers are boarding - and how quickly and sensors on the trains and tracks monitor every last component to provide early warnings when maintenance is required and prevent a costly breakdown. They use smartphone apps, social media and the web to give citizens real-time alerts and alternative routes - and keep this megacity running smoothly. Transport is just the start. Seoul’s city planners are using data to better understand more of the big challenges this fast-growing city faces, from air pollution to affordable housing. There are an estimated 30,000 start-ups in South Korea - many of which are offering innovative solutions to challenges like the city’s housing shortages. One company uses this open-source data to pair up young people looking for accommodation with older citizens who have rooms to spare. It’s a tiny offshoot of an industry that is growing rapidly in cities across the world. By 2020, this so-called “smart city” industry will be worth an estimated $1.5 trillion dollars. There’ll be investment in everything from networks and sensors to new apps and services, from the world’s biggest technology firms, to innovative new startups working from someone’s front room. This is the headquarters of FLARE, a start-up based in Kenya. Its young entrepreneurs are working with real-time data sourced from that most ubiquitous of modern innovations: the smartphone. Kenya’s capital, Nairobi is emerging as a vibrant tech hub. It is also one of the fastest growing cities in the world. Home to 4.2 million people, it’s more than doubled its population in the last 20 years. As in many cities in developing countries the ageing, inadequate infrastructure is struggling to cope. The problem isn't a shortage of ambulances - Nairobi has 150 of them - double the number needed in an average city. But the city has no centralized emergency service to coordinate them. Residents here are faced with 50 different numbers to call for help - and no guarantee when - or whether - their ambulance will arrive. The app aims to do the job of a centralized emergency service, compiling real-time data to coordinate and connect patients in need, available ambulances and the right hospitals or healthcare providers. Across the developing world, innovators are increasingly exploiting existing technology to help citizens cope with their cities’ overstretched infrastructure. In America, innovators are also looking ahead to the next wave - anticipating data-driven technologies that could help predict problems before they even happen. Boston, Massachusetts, is the 10th largest metropolitan area in America. It’s home to 4.8 million residents. And while Boston may be one of the oldest urban settlements in this country it’s fast developing world leading technology that could help shape the cities of the future. This is the mission of MIT’s Senseable City Lab - to anticipate the impact of technology on urban life and use it to transform the way cities are run. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 195148 The Economist
The changing space race | The Economist
 
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The space race has changed since the Soviet Union sent Sputnik 1, the first man-made satellite, into space in 1957. The fight for domination is now between private companies rather than governments. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 The first man-made satellite Sputnik 1 was sent into space in 1957 by the Soviet Union. At the time only governments could afford to launch satellites but technological advances have lowered the barriers to entry and more companies are joining the fray producing commercial rockets like Falcon 9, one of the cheapest on the market, at $62 million. Satellite industry expenditure has gone sky high. It now accounts for 38% of spending on all space projects. Tech start-ups have been building smaller satellites which can be built and launched at lower cost than those created by space agencies. "Nano satellites" are not much bigger than a shoebox and can provide more comprehensive coverage at a cheaper cost. Tiny satellites cover smaller areas of the globe than their larger predecessors. This enables them to update imagery more frequently. Launching a satellite would once have required an entire rocket but now a single rocket can carry a large enough payload to propel numerous satellites into space using multiple modules, lowering the cost. In February 2017, 104 satellites were sent into orbit from India, the most aboard a single rocket. Companies are also trying to create re-usable rockets to reduce their costs significantly. The Earth is now surrounded by an ever-growing belt of orbiting machinery. When satellites come to the end of their lives they either burn up in the Earth's atmosphere or become space junk. The danger is that the density of objects in low earth orbit will increase the change of collisions which could endanger global communications. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 26893 The Economist
What is the clothing of the future: SMART wearables & e-textiles
 
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The idea of creating smart clothing was first prompted by the science fiction but even experts didn’t expect the e-textile revolution to start to fast and progress so rapidly. Nowadays smart clothing is used to encase wearable technology and provide the user with new, unseen before capabilities and functionality. There are many working prototypes and startups, which are aimed at redefining the fashion industry. Right now wearable technology has found its best use in the sport, fitness, wellness and medical industries (special monitors may be used for tracking all the vital body metrics) but creative solutions may influence the creation of casual clothing (there are already substances, which can make clothing repel water, dust and other pollutants). Smart clothing is definitely a thing of the future and this industry has everything it takes to become a mainstream technology. More about such technologies here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixN3Uf6ZrRo In this video presentation we have reviewed such futuristic clothing designs (fair use of footage, all credits are below and in the video): - Synapse dress, which lights up the dress, depending on the person’s moon: www.vimeo.com/106431614 - Smart fitness tracker, which can help monitor performance to reach better results: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zbtc-unamZs - A smart shoe, which can change its style: www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-HAu9FEbss - An overview of a smart-shirt created for running: www.youtube.com/watch?v=zO80nmgCbZs - A scientific story about the technology of smart gloves, used for gesture-controlling technology: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ci-yB6EgVW4 - The special compound, which makes clothing waterproof and resistant to pollutants (hydrophobic clothing). Thanks for your time. Please share your thoughts on the clothes of the future.
Where is the world's most liveable city? | The Economist
 
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Where is the world's most liveable city? The Economist Intelligence Unit has ranked 140 cities based on their liveability. Melbourne, Australia, has been ranked the world's most liveable city for the past seven years but it has lost the top spot to Vienna. See the full report: eiu.com/liveability Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 210205 The Economist
Is fast fashion destroying our environment?
 
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In this Our Changing Climate environmental video essay, I look at the environmental impact of fast fashion. Specifically, I look at how fast fashion impacts climate change through the production process of polyester and post-consumption through waste. As a result, stores like H&M, Uniqlo, and Zara have huge carbon footprints and negatively affect the environment. Help me make more videos like this via Patreon: http://bit.ly/2iz4lIV Twitter: https://twitter.com/OurClimateNow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/occvideos/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/occ.climate/ Email: [email protected] ______ Resources: 1. If your clothes aren’t already made out of plastic, they will be (Quartz): https://qz.com/414223/if-your-clothes-arent-already-made-out-of-plastic-they-will-be/ 2. How H&M Churns Out New Styles In Just 2 Weeks (Business Insider): https://www.businessinsider.com/hm-produces-new-fashions-in-two-weeks-2014-9 3. Inside the lonely fight against the biggest environmental problem you've never heard (The Guardian): ofhttps://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2014/oct/27/toxic-plastic-synthetic-microscopic-oceans-microbeads-microfibers-food-chain 4. Here’s How Much It Actually Costs to Make Your Shirt (Racked): https://www.racked.com/2017/1/6/14157836/elizabeth-suzann-money-talk 5. Your next item of clothing should be so expensive it hurts (Quartz): https://qz.com/507904/your-next-item-of-clothing-should-be-so-expensive-it-hurts/ 6. The High Cost of Our Cheap Fashion (TEDx): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5r8V4QWwxf0 #fastfashion #waste #climatechange I use Artlist.io for all my music. You can get 2 months free of Artlist.io with this link: https://artlist.io/Charlie-278823
Views: 48410 Our Changing Climate
What will people wear in the future? | The Economist
 
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Innovation in fashion is sparking radical change. In the future clothes could be computers, made with materials designed and grown in a lab. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy A new wave of innovation is fuelling a radical change in fashion. Wearable technology, data, automation and lab-grown materials will have a major impact on what people will be wearing in the future. Since the birth of sewing and weaving, technology has always led developments in fashion. The Industrial Revolution mechanized manufacturing enabling mass production. In the 1960s synthetic materials like polyester took off, creating new possibilities for fashion. Now the convergence of new technologies is opening up previously unimaginable possibilities. Self-styled fashion scientist Dr Amanda Parkes is in the vanguard of the industry's latest reinvention. She heads up innovation at FT labs, a venture capital firm that invests primarily in disruptive fashion tech startups. Among these startups the race is on to find the next generation of renewable materials that can be grown in a lab. Traditional silk is produced from insect larvae that form cocoons, most commonly silkworms. But rather than relying on these insects bolt threads is creating silk in test tubes. Bio fabricated materials remove the need for animals and insects and they are a more sustainable and efficient way of producing raw materials. Other companies are creating leather alternatives. Rather than using animals scientists are creating bio fabricated materials from pineapple leaves and even mushrooms. The convergence of fashion and technology also provides opportunities to transform not just clothes but the people wearing them. Myant is a company that's pioneering the creation of clothing that can monitor your every move. So called smart fabrics are being touted as the next frontier of wearable technology. Yarns are paired with electronic sensors so that essential data can be captured from the human body. To create clothing that can monitor the wearer's health and fitness, Myant has brought together teams of people that have not traditionally worked under the same roof. Smart fabrics could radically change consumers relationships with the clothes they wear but as technology increases the pace of change, how can the industry keep track of what consumers really want? Francesca Muston is the head of retail at WGSN, the world's leading fashion forecasting agency. The staff here use big data to analyze political, social, and environmental trends in order to predict the hot new looks of tomorrow. Technology is driving an explosion in consumer choice as well as the bewildering array of clothing design and creation. To keep up the industry is also turning to technology. Machine learning technologies are now central to fashion forecasting, quickly spotting patterns among the ever-growing volume of data. From biotechnology to demographic shifts predicting trends is no longer an art it's becoming a science. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 83406 The Economist
What makes elite athletes thrive or dive under pressure? | The Economist
 
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Psychology is an increasingly important part of elite sport. Winning at the highest levels can depend as much on peak-fitness of the mind as the body. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Sponsored by DXC Technology. for top-level sports people it's not just skill and athleticism they count. So often, it's mind over matter. Psychology is now seen as increasingly vital to winning. In elite sport the difference between success and failure is often the finest of margins. The annual boat race between Oxford and Cambridge universities is one of the oldest and most prestigious events in the sporting calendar. For the competitors, it's 20 minutes of pure pain but also pure pressure. How the rowers cope with that intense pressure can make the difference between glory and failure. The Cambridge women's team have won the last two races and this woman has been one of the secrets of their success. Sports psychologist Helen Davis has worked on specific techniques to help the team at the most mentally testing moments in the race. As training for the 2019 race intensifies, just trying to keep up with teammates is mentally grueling. Understanding what makes athletes cope or panic at those crucial moments is an ever-growing obsession in professional sport - it's the multi-billion dollar question that sports psychologists are constantly trying to answer. Dr Jamie Barker lectures at the world's leading sports science university Loughborough in Britain. In 2013 Jamie helped devise a cardiovascular test. It compared the physiological reactions of athletes who thrive in a high-pressure situation with those who flop. A group of aspiring professional cricketers were set a specific target. The cricketers were warned that their results would be made public and would decide who makes the team and who doesn't. Nearly half the players hit the test for six and scored the runs and most of them went into what psychologists call a challenge state. Over half the batsman found themselves on a stickier wicket and failed to make the runs they mostly entered the so-called threat state. Jamie employs a mental visualization technique that sports psychologists have used with a variety of professional teams. Athletes are asked a picture a set of scales - on one side are their demands, the obstacles to success. They're taught to tip the balance the other way towards their resources, the attributes they possess that can help them. Sports psychology is sometimes criticized as a phony science but many major sports teams and personalities now use psychologists and there's a growing acceptance that this boosts performances. In sports, as in the world beyond, a mental edge can bring a winning one. In elite sport the difference between winning and losing often hangs on the smallest of margins. As coaches, teams and athletes press ever harder in pursuit of victory, this series reveals the latest innovative approaches they hope will keep them ahead. From data to design, science to psychology, discover what it takes to find the winning edge. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 123967 The Economist
Mapping poverty in America | The Economist
 
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America is the richest country in the world, but it also has one of the biggest divides between rich and poor. What can a zip code reveal about inequality? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy The United States is the world's richest country. It is also one of the most unequal. 40 million people live in poverty - that's around 12% of the population. It has the highest poverty rate in the rich world and three men own as much wealth as the bottom half of the population. The good news is that poverty has decreased over the past two years but income inequality has increased, resulting in a growing gap between the rich and the poor. Although the cost of living varies from state to state, the poverty line is currently set at an annual household income of $25,100 for a family of four. The wealthiest states are coastal, with the south having a higher concentration of poorer States. In Mississippi around 20% of people live below the poverty line. That's the highest percentage of any state in the country. In New Hampshire it's less than half that. California and Missouri have around the same percentage. Whereas poverty in neighboring Virginia and West Virginia is poles apart. Poverty rates can wildly vary between towns within states. Take Paris, Texas, which has a rate of 41% while in neighboring Reno it's just 3%. The wealth divide can also be seen fluctuating between blocks and even streets. In different blocks on separate sides of Ocean Parkway in Brooklyn, New York, the poverty rate is six times that of the other. Poverty in America is not only geographical, it's also racial. African-Americans are more than twice as likely to live in poverty than white Americans, but it's Native Americans who have the highest poverty rate of any race in the country, and this is even higher for those who live on reservations. Poverty declined in the majority of states in 2017 . Income growth, welfare programs, and more jobs have led to the decline - but if the incomes of the top 1% continued to grow faster than those of the other 99%, the gap between the rich and the poor will continue to widen. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2o8kfOB Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2o8kglD Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2o8khpH Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2o8khWJ Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2o8kitL
Views: 84952 The Economist
Is your job safe - collaboration, automation, annihilation? | The Economist
 
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The world of work will be radically different in the future. From hyper-surveillance of staff to digital nomadism to robots taking jobs—how, where and why we work is changing beyond all recognition. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy This is the workforce of the future. Technology is transforming the world of work beyond all recognition creating groundbreaking opportunities. But it's also eroding the rights of workers. Some even fear a dystopian jobless future. But are these anxieties overblown? How we react to this brave new world of work today will shape societies for generations to come. What are the forces shaping how people live and work and how power is wielded in the modern age? NOW AND NEXT reveals the pressures, the plans and the likely tipping points for enduring global change. Understand what is really transforming the world today – and discover what may lie in store tomorrow. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 165646 The Economist
What could threaten Amazon’s empire? | The Economist
 
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Amazon accounts for more than half of every dollar spent online in America and is the world's leading provider of cloud computing. But can the company avoid the attention of the regulators? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 This week we put Amazon on the cover. Amazon is a remarkable company but what's extraordinary about it is the scale of its ambitions. Its shareholders expect it to grow faster for longer than any big company in modern business history and we asked whether it can do so. More than half of every new online dollar that's spent in America goes to Amazon. It's already the world's biggest cloud computing firm; it's set to spend more on TV investments than HBO, a big cable channel, next year. Amazon's success is built on two things in particular. One is its willingness to think about the long term - in an era when chief executives complain about the pressure to deliver results on a quarterly basis, Jeff Bezos, Amazon's founder and chief executive, thinks in terms of years and decades. It's expressly been part of its business model to take the cash that it earns and to invest it in order to take advantage of what it calls network effect, the idea is that more users you attract to its e-commerce site the more attractive it is to other retailers and therefore the more users come on to the site. Its bet is that if you invest hard for the long term the rewards will be enormous. The other thing that distinguishes Amazon is the span of its activities. It's no longer right to think about Amazon as a retailer. In its filings it lists as competitors everyone from media companies to food manufacturers, social networks to logistics firms. It is a conglomerate that spreads across all commerce. The amazing thing about Amazon is that it could well achieve investors expectations for it, but if it does then it could run into a problem, and that problem is the regulators. At the moment antitrust enforcers don't particularly worry about Amazon. It's not even the biggest retailer in America, it's most mature market. But if it gets as big as shareholders expect it to then they may start to look at it and not just because of antitrust rules but also because it will become a kind of utility for commerce. Lots of competitors will rely on it for services. Renting warehouses, for example, paying for goods, and that dependence on Amazon could be a reason for the government to look at it more closely and with that it's business maybe threatened. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films every day of the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 63747 The Economist
Plastic pollution: is it really that bad? | The Economist
 
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Nine in ten Europeans worry about plastic’s impact on the environment. But plastic is not the worst offender when compared to other kinds of pollution
Views: 58637 The Economist
Who is going to win the US mid-term elections? | The Economist
 
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Democrats in the age of Trump: https://youtu.be/ynYTVRVHddg Can the Democrats take back the House of Representatives from the Republicans? In what is perhaps the most significant mid-terms ever, The Economist's Data Editor gives our prediction on who is going to win. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 250053 The Economist
Tara Westover: Mormons, Harry Potter and the future of education | The Economist Podcast
 
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Tara Westover grew up in a strict Mormon family—she was 17 when she first stepped into a classroom. Now she is a best-selling author. She spoke to Anne McElvoy about her life and the future of education for "The Economist asks" podcast. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 118204 The Economist

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