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How fast fashion adds to the world's clothing waste problem (Marketplace)
 
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Fast fashion is a major contributor to the world's clothing waste problem. Many of us give our old clothes to charity or drop them in a store take-back bin, but you might be surprised to learn most of it is sold and can end up in the landfill. To read more: http://cbc.ca/1.4493490 »»» Subscribe to CBC News to watch more videos: http://bit.ly/1RreYWS Connect with CBC News Online: For breaking news, video, audio and in-depth coverage: http://bit.ly/1Z0m6iX Find CBC News on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1WjG36m Follow CBC News on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1sA5P9H For breaking news on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1WjDyks Follow CBC News on Instagram: http://bit.ly/1Z0iE7O Download the CBC News app for iOS: http://apple.co/25mpsUz Download the CBC News app for Android: http://bit.ly/1XxuozZ »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»» For more than 75 years, CBC News has been the source Canadians turn to, to keep them informed about their communities, their country and their world. Through regional and national programming on multiple platforms, including CBC Television, CBC News Network, CBC Radio, CBCNews.ca, mobile and on-demand, CBC News and its internationally recognized team of award-winning journalists deliver the breaking stories, the issues, the analyses and the personalities that matter to Canadians.
Views: 459287 CBC News
Why does time pass? | The Economist
 
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The equations of physics suggest time should be able to go backwards as well as forwards. Experience suggests, though, that it cannot. Why? And is time travel really possible? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Why does time pass? It is a question so profound that few people would even think to ask it. Yet its effects are all around. Human beings live in a perpetual present, inexorably sealed off from the past, but moving relentlessly into the future. For most people, time seems to be something that is just out there. A thing ticking away in the background - fixed, immutable. Time seems to go in one direction and in one direction only. But physicists see it much differently. One of the great minds who changed the way science thinks about time was Albert Einstein. In 1905 he published his special theory of relativity. In it he demonstrated that time passes differently in different places depending on how those places are moving with respect to one another. Einstein showed that the faster one travels the slower time goes for the traveler. At the speeds at which humans move this is imperceptible. But for someone traveling on a spaceship at speeds close to that of light, time would slow down compared with its passage for people on earth. There was another important aspect of Einstein's theory which he didn't even realize when he published it. That time was woven into the very fabric of space itself. Einstein used this insight to help develop his general theory of relativity which incorporated gravity. He published it in 1915. With the general theory of relativity he demonstrated that massive objects warped the fabric of space-time. It is this curvature that causes time to slow down near them. Time slows down in proportion to the gravitational pull of a nearby object so the effect would be strong near a black hole but milder near the earth. But even here it can be detected. Einstein's theories had to be taken into account when the GPS system was set up otherwise it would have been inaccurate. One scientist who puzzled over the directionality of time was Arthur Eddington, a 20th century astronomer who defined the concept of the arrow of time, based on observations made by the 19th century physicist Ludwig Boltzmann. The arrow of time is based on the second law of thermodynamics which says the disorder known as entropy increases with time. For example, a building left untouched will slowly decay into its surroundings. It will disintegrate into a more chaotic state but it is highly unlikely that the building will become more orderly over time - this is because there are many more ways for a system to be disorderly than orderly. There can be many ways for something to break for instance but only one way for it to be put back together again. A system will be less disordered in the past and more disordered in the future. This is the arrow of time. So how can the arrow of time be reconciled with Einstein's equations? If time can go forwards and backwards according to relativity does that mean it's possible to go backwards in time? The theory of relativity does allow time travel to the future. Einstein's theories do allow for the formation of wormholes in space. These are shortcuts that link otherwise distant places in the space-time continuum. Although wormholes are theoretically possible they're a highly implausible proposition. That's because the equations suggest enormous masses and energies would be required to create and manipulate one. What remains then is a mystery. Theory fails to forbid traveling backwards in time but practice suggests it might just as well be forbidden. For now it would appear the arrow of time cannot be reversed. No one knows why time passes but it seems that no matter how people look at it, it goes in one direction in one direction only. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Read our Tumblr: http://theeconomist.tumblr.com/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6
Views: 2358143 The Economist
Why NASA Is Sending An $850 Million Drill To Mars
 
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NASA is sending an $850 million lander to Mars. Using a drill to dig deeper into the planet than ever before, Insight will be the first of its kind to study Mars’ interior. This mission will help us learn more about the origins of our solar system. ------------------------------------------------------ #NASA #Mars #ScienceInsider Following is the transcript of the video: NASA's about to break new ground like never before, by sending a giant drill to Mars. It's the largest drill NASA has ever sent to space, and it will dig deeper into Mars than ever before. The mission? Uncover clues to one of the most outstanding mysteries in our solar system. NASA's $850 million InSight Lander is the first designed to study the interior structure of Mars. Until now, NASA's landers mainly focused on exploring Mars' surface for signs of potential life. They've touched down near volcanoes, valleys, and canyons. But InSight won't be going anywhere like that, since InSight is not a rover and can't move around. NASA has one shot to land it in the perfect spot, here! Elysium Planitia, sometimes referred to as the biggest parking lot on Mars. It's one of the plainest spots NASA could find and the perfect place for InSight. For one, it's close to the equator, guaranteeing the solar panels that power InSight's instruments will work year-round for its nearly two-year mission. But most importantly, that smooth surface will make it easier for InSight's drill to bore deep into the Martian soil. The drill works like a motorized nail, hammering itself into the ground. Over the course of 40 days, the drill will reach 16 feet into the planet. That's roughly the length of a car. For comparison, NASA's Curiosity Rover only dug about half an inch deep. That's the length of an aspirin pill. As InSight digs, it will occasionally shoot out bursts of heat. By calculating how quickly that heat warms the ground around it, InSight can measure the chemical makeup of the soil. But InSight's drill pulls double duty. As it hammers away, it also sends vibrations through the ground, which are sensitive to different layers that might be hiding under the surface. For example, if Mars has underground lava flows, those vibrations will find them. But this only gives NASA clues to the shallower layers of Mars. To understand the deep inner core, InSight has another tool that will measure how much Mars wobbles on its axis. It works similar to an egg. If you spin an uncooked egg, the liquid yolk will slosh around making the egg wobble. But if the inside is cooked, there's less wobble. Similarly, how much Mars wobbles can tell us whether its core is molten liquid or solid metal. And all these clues can help scientists solve a bigger mystery of how rocky planets like Mars and Earth formed in the first place. By studying the interior of Mars, scientists can get a better grasp on how Mars has evolved over billions of years from a warm, wet world to the desolate landscape it is today. But there's an even bigger objective on the horizon. Ultimately, the more we know about our own solar system, the better we get at searching for other planets beyond our solar system that may have the potential to harbor life. ------------------------------------------------------ Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider INSIDER on Snapchat: https://insder.co/2KJLtVo ------------------------------------------------------ Why NASA Is Sending An $850 Million Drill To Mars
Views: 38422 Tech Insider
Where does your phone come from? | The Economist
 
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Apple is expected to announce its latest handset—the iPhone XS. Like all smartphones it will contain more than 70 chemical elements, which are mined from the Earth's crust in countries all over the world. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy The number of smartphone users globally is set to reach 2.5 billion by 2019. Around a third of the world's population will own one. Smartphones touch every element of our lives but did you know that they also connect nearly every element on the planet. In fact of the 118 elements on the periodic table 75 can be found inside a smartphone. These raw materials are extracted from the ground and shipped to refineries and factories in a truly global supply chain. Silicon, one of the most common elements in the Earth's crust, is used to make the billions of transistors in the chips that power your phone. Gold is used for electrical wiring, about 0.03g of it in each iPhone. Indium, another metal, is used to make touchscreens. But when it comes to batteries, lithium is one really key components and this element is only mined in a handful of countries. Until recently, Chile used to produce the most lithium but now Australia has the biggest market share. The Democratic Republic of Congo, a dangerously unstable country with a poor human rights record, produces more than half the world's cobalt, another crucial element in smartphone batteries. Smartphone makers are under pressure to ensure their cobalt is responsibly sourced. About 80% of the cobalt used in batteries is refined in China. Many so-called rare earth elements are also used in smartphones. In the screen, the speaker, and the motor that makes your phone vibrate. About 85% of rare earth elements are produced in China. Despite their name rare earth elements are not particularly rare but they are hard to extract without producing toxic and radioactive byproducts. Many of the elements used in smartphones are finite resources and have no functional substitutes. Rather than digging in the ground for the elements needed for new handsets it makes sense to extract them from old phones - but only about 10% of handsets are recycled now. So recycle your phone if you get a new one this year. Why? It is you might say, Elementary. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 53765 The Economist
Journey Through India: Bangalore | CNBC International
 
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Bengaluru, still commonly referred to as Bangalore, is a cosmopolitan and progressive city widely recognized as one of the biggest tech hubs of India. CNBC's Tom Chitty explores what makes it so special on the third stop of his Journey Through India. ----- Subscribe to us on YouTube: http://cnb.cx/2wuoARM Subscribe to CNBC Life on YouTube: http://cnb.cx/2wAkfMv Like our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/cnbcinternational Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cnbcinternational/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CNBCi
Views: 173235 CNBC International
How to prepare for the next global recession | The Economist
 
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A decade after the global recession, the world’s economy is vulnerable again. Ryan Avent, our economics columnist, considers how the next recession might happen—and what governments can do about it Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 883398 The Economist
The US’s other Debt Crisis - VisualPolitik EN
 
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The US economy is going through a fabulous moment. After 10 years of uninterrupted economic growth, the great American engine is working at full speed: industrial production, the SP 500 and exports are at record highs while unemployment is at its lowest level in 20 years. However, the US economy has another face of which we’ve already talked about here in VisualPolitik: the public debt and the federal government deficit are out of control. However, the federal government isn’t the only debt and credit addict. In this video, we’ll talk about the other debt crisis that looms over the American giant. Support us on Patreon! www.patreon.com/visualpolitik And don't forget to visit our friend’s podcast, Reconsider Media: http://www.reconsidermedia.com/
Views: 46316 VisualPolitik EN
How powerful is your passport? | The Economist
 
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Passports can tell you a lot about a country. Colour can be a statement of national identity, state religion, or international co-operation. But not all passports are equal. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2Gbhx2T Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2GeS3C1 Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2GaGL1x Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2GbhxzV Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2GaGM5B Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2GaGMCD
Views: 1023146 The Economist
Wooden skyscrapers could be the future for cities | The Economist
 
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Wooden skyscrapers are an ambitious and innovative solution to the problems posed by urbanisation. Not only are they faster to build, they have smaller carbon footprints than high-rises made of concrete and steel. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2GCblkl By 2050 the world’s population is expected to soar to almost 10 billion people and two-thirds of us will live in cities. Space will be at a premium. High-rise offers a solution. But concrete and steel – the materials we currently use to build high – have a large carbon footprint. An answer might lie in a natural material we’ve used for millennia. Throughout history buildings have been made of wood. But it has one major drawback. It acts as kindling. Fire destroyed large swathes of some of the world’s great cities. But by the early twentieth century, the era of modern steelmaking had arrived. Steel was strong, could be moulded into any shape and used to reinforce concrete. It allowed architects to build higher than ever before. So why, after more than a century of concrete and steel, are some architects proposing a return to wood? Concrete and steel are costly to produce and heavy to transport. Wood however can be grown sustainably and it’s lighter than concrete. And crucially, as trees grow, they absorb carbon dioxide from the air, locking it into the timber. One study showed that using wood to construct a 125-metre skyscraper could reduce a building’s carbon footprint by up to 75% Regular timber isn’t malleable like steel or concrete, and isn’t strong enough to build high. But engineers have come up with a solution. It’s called cross-laminated timber, or CLT for short. CLT is light and it’s comparable in strength to concrete and steel. But how does it cope when burnt with a high heat source? London architects Waugh Thistleton are already designing buildings with this new kind of timber. Andrew and his colleagues designed Britain’s first high-rise wooden apartment block and have recently completed the world’s largest timber-based building. Behind these bricks is a timber core, made from more than 2000 trees, sourced from sustainable forests. And this London practice is not alone in advocating the use of CLT. Ambitious wooden high-rise buildings are also being constructed in Scandinavia, central Europe and North America. As yet, nobody has used CLT to build beyond 55 metres. But Michael Ramage’s research centre in Cambridge, working with another London practice, has proposed a concept design of a 300-metre tower, that could be built on top of one of London’s most iconic concrete structures – the Barbican. Making that jump in height will be a difficult sell. The cost of building wooden skyscrapers is largely unknown, but those costs could be reduced by prefabricating large sections of buildings in factories. And city-dwellers will need to be persuaded that CLT does not burn like ordinary wood. As an attractive, natural material, wood is already popular for use in low buildings. If planners approve, it could rise to new heights. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2GCbm7T Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2GCbnIZ Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2GAXgUa Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2GAXhrc Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2GAXivg
Views: 543835 The Economist
Putin's games with the West | The Economist
 
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As presidential elections take place in Russia, chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov talks about the games President Putin is playing with the West. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.st/2GBpCOs Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://econ.st/2GDXPxf Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: http://econ.st/2GBpEpy Follow The Economist on Twitter: http://econ.st/2GAgvxK Follow us on Instagram: http://econ.st/2GBpEWA Follow us on Medium: http://econ.st/2GBpFtC
Views: 279459 The Economist
Fast Fashion’s Effect on People, The Planet, & You | Patrick Woodyard | TEDxUniversityofMississippi
 
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Mindful business: While working for a microfinance firm in Trujillo, Peru, Patrick was introduced to the broken Peruvian footwear industry made up of over 100,000 shoemakers who possess remarkable talent yet lack access to consistent work, fair-wages, and brand access to established international markets. Having had extensive exposure to such potential juxtaposed with a lack of access in other developing countries, Patrick developed a vision to push the fashion industry in a new direction by serving as one of the first fashion brands to deliver a superior yet ethically-produced product to consumers. Patrick is the Co-Founder & CEO of Nisolo. Patrick graduated from the Croft Institute for International Studies and Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College at the University of Mississippi. His experience using business as a force for good has led him across the globe ranging from Kenya and Uganda to Argentina and Peru. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 46019 TEDx Talks
The future of the car industry | The Economist
 
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Ride-hailing apps such as Uber, Ola and Lyft are not only challenging taxi drivers around the world, they are also disrupting the car industry as a whole as people prefer to hail a ride than buy their own set of wheels. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 The Disrupters is an original series exploring how major industries—from music and cars to hospitality—are currently being disrupted by the latest wave of digital innovation. As well as enjoying privileged access into the world biggest tech start ups we show how industry giants respond when faced with such tech-driven innovation. Do they adapt—or die? The name of Ola's founder and chief executive officer is spelled incorrectly in this video. It should be Bhavish Aggarwal. We are sorry for the error. June 1st, 2016. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Read our Tumblr: http://theeconomist.tumblr.com/ Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Check out our Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6
Views: 109098 The Economist
Ask Steve: Surprise We Gone Get Naked || STEVE HARVEY
 
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Steve helps a woman who wants to surprise her friends with a trip to a nude spa. Subscribe now to the STEVE HARVEY YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1K5UsMy Find out where to watch in your city here: http://steveharveytv.com/watch/ Get more Steve Harvey! Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/SteveHarveyTV Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/iamsteveharveytv Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/IAmSteveHarvey Hulu: http://www.hulu.com/steve-harvey
Views: 518387 Steve TV Show
The dim reality of South Africa's new dawn | The Economist
 
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In April 1994, South Africa held its first democratic elections and all races went to the polls to bury apartheid for good. But hopes of a new dawn have been tarnished by fraud and corruption at the highest levels. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 23 years ago this week, after centuries of white supremacists rule, black South Africans were able to vote for the first time in history. It was the culmination of decades of struggle. In 1994 The Economist reported that it was an event many South Africans had thought they would never live to see - all races alike went to the polls to bury apartheid for good. The first democratic vote marked the end of sanctioned racial oppression of apartheid. The world watched as South Africa heralded a new dawn of democracy and promise. Lawson Naidoo was an activist in exile for the African National Congress party. The party of black liberation was banned until 1990. The Economist reported that the result has never been in doubt. An outright majority victory for the ANC - to be followed by the election of Mr. Mandela, as South Africa's first black president. The ANC's victory immediately paved the way for a new constitution written for a new South Africa. Thuli Madonsela was one of the experts who helped draft it. Yet after more than two decades in charge, corruption undermines the democracy the ANC fought so hard to establish. The tone is set at the top. The President Jacob Zuma may soon face over 700 charges of fraud. In her role as Public Protector, Madonsela held the government to account for the last seven years. Her report into Zuma’s use of public money on his private home led to death threats. The highest court found Zuma had violated the constitution by refusing to pay the money back. Earlier this year Parliament descended into chaos with opposition politicians denouncing Zuma because of corruption allegations. Lawson Naidoo lost faith in the party he fought for - he now campaigns for government reform. South Africa now has one of the world's most unequal societies with high unemployment and a faltering economy. The great hopes of the vote in 1994 have been tarnished leaving many embittered without better leadership this is unlikely to change. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 53767 The Economist
Who is going to win the US mid-term elections? | The Economist
 
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Democrats in the age of Trump: https://youtu.be/ynYTVRVHddg Can the Democrats take back the House of Representatives from the Republicans? In what is perhaps the most significant mid-terms ever, The Economist's Data Editor gives our prediction on who is going to win. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 247358 The Economist
E-Scooters Are Driving People Insane
 
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App-enabled electric scooters have popped up in cities around the world, creating legions of sworn enemies and exuberant fans along the way. Bloomberg QuickTake explains the public's love/hate relationship with e-scooters, and why they might be key to building the city of the future. Video by Henry Baker, Sylvia Yang
Views: 71111 Bloomberg
Populism is reshaping our world | The Economist
 
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From the streets of Turin to Silicon Valley, people power is taking the world by storm. With frustrations rising and the old order apparently crumbling, who really has the answers? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 December 2016 Italy's populist opposition is shaking up the establishment. They're days away from a referendum that could spell the end for the Italian government and make it the latest domino in the toppling international order. Around the world populist leaders are connecting with voters fed up with politics as usual and exploiting anger at an establishment out of touch with ordinary people. But giving voice to people's frustrations is one thing, offering them real answers is quite another. Five Star's anti-establishment message is resonating with voters. It is now Italy's biggest opposition party. The country has been crippled by recession and stagnating wages. With rates of inequality among the highest in Europe many people feel left behind by globalization and let down by political leaders. Now the populists sense there may be an opportunity to bring those leaders down. A referendum on constitutional reform has become a vote of confidence in the ruling elite. Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has said he will resign if the country votes no. He's the latest politician to find himself in the firing line. Tonight, thousands of five-star supporters are gathering at a rally in Turin. Some are starting to ask what they might do with success. Beppe Grillo has vowed to get rid of political parties but he certainly knows how to start one. Grillo's success has come through impassioned charges against the corrupt elites and global forces he blames for Italy's woes but five stars leaders may soon have a harder note to hear. A question of how they would tackle unemployment and inequality. Two days after the rally Italians overwhelmingly voted no in the referendum. Prime Minister Renzi made good on his promise to stand down. It's another victory for populism as across the world charismatic leaders defy expectations. They're finding success selling deceptively simple answers to difficult questions. They almost always blame the failings of free trade and mass migration for rising inequality but is this the right target? Few cities are immune to the uneven impact of globalization. The latest venture from a San Francisco startup has the potential to turn one of America's most iconic industries on its head. Last year Uber paid $680 million for Otto, a company whose technology could fundamentally change trucking forever. It allows a truck to drive down a highway with nobody at the wheel. The company claims it could save the industry billions of dollars a year, reduce emissions by a third and eliminate the driver errors that cause up to 87% of truck crashes. But this bright sounding future has a dark side. A series of studies have found technology, not globalization, to be the biggest driver of inequality in developed countries. There were three and a half million people employed in trucking in America and with their industry seemingly the next in line for automation many face an uncertain future. As inequality grows in Western democracies, wealthy California has become one of the most economically unequal states in America as technology has displaced many lower skilled jobs. An alienated public turned on the establishment because it failed to provide answers. As some tech giants become as powerful as that establishment, it's a lesson they're starting to learn. So they're going back to school. For too many people in western democracies progress is still something that happens to other people. Wealth does not spread itself. An underclass appears beyond help, finding a way to reconnect with them and provide an alternative to populism will be at the top of the agenda for the political and business leaders of tomorrow THE AGENDA explores the defining questions of our time and seeks out the stories, solutions and the personalities who might just hold the answers. Discover the mould-breakers experimenting with new ways to approach some of the modern world's most fundamental issues; find out what happens when bold ideas and real life collide, and meet the leaders whose thoughts and actions are themselves helping to shape the agenda. Series One of The Agenda: People Power gets to grips with the rise of populism and what lies behind it. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 604242 The Economist
Why New Yorkers Insisted On a "Worse" Subway Map - Cheddar Explains
 
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Simplified metro system maps have been adopted by cities around the world, but when New York City tried to follow suit the public pushback forced a reversal. We dive into why New Yorkers insisted on using a "worse" subway map instead of the one that was widely considered to be "perfectly" designed. Subscribe to Cheddar on YouTube: http://chdr.tv/subscribe Connect with Cheddar! On Facebook: http://chdr.tv/facebook On Twitter: http://chdr.tv/twitter On Instagram: http://chdr.tv/instagram On Cheddar.com: http://chdr.tv/cheddar
Views: 563072 Cheddar
Women and the Saudi revolution | The Economist
 
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Saudi Arabia is one of the most conservative countries in the world. But a social revolution has begun. The Economist's editor, Zanny Minton Beddoes takes a road-trip around Riyadh to examine what a more moderate Saudi would mean for its women, and the rest of the world. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2zc9nHO Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2zg5DVw Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2z9xI0Z Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2zg5FwC Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2zg5G3E Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2zbI6VU
Views: 75061 The Economist
Brexit draft: How many Brits still want to leave the EU? | DW News
 
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In the British city of Romford, 70 percent of the people voted for Brexit. But as ambassadors from the European Union member states gather in Brussels to discuss the latest Brexit draft agreement, many Brits who voted to leave the EU don't like what they see. How do the people of Romford feel now? For a related story, go to: https://p.dw.com/p/38Rif "German BDI industry head warns of 'disastrous' hard Brexit with no deal" Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/user/deutschewelleenglish?sub_confirmation=1 For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewellenews/ ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ►Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deutschewelle #Brexit #Regrexit #DWNews
Views: 8178 DW English
Discover Hyderabad | The Economist
 
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Hyderabad, India's fourth biggest city, is fast becoming one of the most exciting visitor destinations in the country. Its booming tech scene is attracting global attention and transforming this ancient city into a cosmopolitan hotspot. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Discover Colombo: https://youtu.be/4COeTrjB6hA Discover Buenos Aires: https://youtu.be/q0pMg6rvc0s Discover Miami: https://youtu.be/sCi4FBN-7dA Discover Oaska: https://youtu.be/cNIrkT3WB24 Discover London: https://youtu.be/mIEsgVd17v8 Once home to the richest man in the world and the center of the global diamond trade, Hyderabad is full of hidden gems - you just have to know where to find them. Three passionate locals are about to take you on a tour of their city, revealing the secret spots where you can experience the real Hyderabad. If you want to capture the vibrancy, colour and sounds of Hyderabad you’ll need to get up early just like the flower merchants of Gudimalkapur flower market. As flowers are an integral part of Indian life—this market attracts buyers and sellers from across the region. It's also a favourite spot for keen photographers. Saurabh has taken his love of photography one step further and now shares it with visitors by running photowalks. By joining Saurabh it's a chance to see this city and its people through a very different lens. So called ‘Cyberabad’ is the home to Hyderabad’s flourishing Tech and Startup community. The ambition is to create India’s answer to Silicon Valley—and it’s fast attracting a young cosmopolitan crowd. But when Srinivas has business visitors he doesn’t take them to the newest parts of town. He takes them to the oldest. The street markets of Charminar in the old city have been the beating heart of Hyderabad for four hundred years. This was the centre of the world's diamond and pearl industry during the time of the Nizam's who ruled over Hyderabad from 1724 to 1948. The diamond industry may have moved on, but the pearl trade is still alive and well giving the city its moniker "The City of Pearls", attracting buyers from around the world. Since arriving in Hyderabad 13 years ago Jonty decided to set up her own business taking people to the true heart of the city, and a place where most travelers never get to visit - the authentic Indian kitchen. Home dining is becoming very popular with travelers but here at Usha’s they don't just come to eat but to learn the secrets and skills of Hyderabadi home cooking. This is no five-star restaurant but it offers visitors an even rarer experience - the opportunity to really see how the locals do it. The Falaknuma Palace Hotel used to be the royal guest house for the richest man in the world Osman Ali Khan, the last Nizam ruler. For those in the know, tea here comes with a personal tour with the resident historian. At the top of Moala Ali Hill is a 16th century dargah - a Muslim shrine. The dargahs reputed healing properties turned it into a pilgrimage site and countless devotees climb the 500 steps to the top. But praying in Hyderabad isn’t all about quiet contemplation — it’s a chance to party too. And with over 50 religious festivals in the calendar year there’s always an opportunity to get involved. Every neighbourhood will hold its own festivities. And for Jonty, it’s the best way to immerse visitors in the Hyderabad street scene. It may seem overwhelming but If you want to properly appreciate these festivals, there’s only one thing for it - leap right in. Some of the most popular festivals last for up to eleven days. ___________________ Passport is an original travel series for the intellectually and culturally curious, exploring some of the most exciting city destinations in the world. The insiders’ guide to each city follows at the shoulder of three local characters as they reveal the experiences and places not covered in the guidebooks. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 56503 The Economist
This 3D Quantum Gas Clock Could Redefine Time
 
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Time may be a human construct but that hasn't stopped physicists from perfecting it. Read More: JILA’s 3-D Quantum Gas Atomic Clock Offers New Dimensions in Measurement https://www.nist.gov/news-events/news/2017/10/jilas-3-d-quantum-gas-atomic-clock-offers-new-dimensions-measurement “JILA physicists have created an entirely new design for an atomic clock, in which strontium atoms are packed into a tiny three-dimensional (3-D) cube at 1,000 times the density of previous one-dimensional (1-D) clocks. In doing so, they are the first to harness the ultra-controlled behavior of a so-called “quantum gas” to make a practical measurement device.” Jun Ye: Let There Be Light (and Thus, Time) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bbBmkooNse4 Dr. Jun Ye, professor of physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder and a fellow of both the National Institute of Standards and Technology and JILA, explains how lasers are used to manipulate atoms inside and out for ultra-precise clocks. Ultra-Accurate Clocks Lead Search for New Laws of Physics https://www.quantamagazine.org/ultra-accurate-clocks-lead-search-for-new-laws-of-physics-20180416/ Atomic clocks are letting physicists tighten the lasso around elusive phenomena such as dark matter. Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI ____________________ Seeker inspires us to see the world through the lens of science and evokes a sense of curiosity, optimism and adventure. Visit the Seeker website https://www.seeker.com/ Subscribe now! https://www.youtube.com/user/DNewsChannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/
Views: 126131 Seeker
Was Karl Marx right? | The Economist
 
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Karl Marx remains surprisingly relevant 200 years after his birth. He rightly predicted some of the pitfalls of capitalism, but his solution was far worse than the disease. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2FEY1tD Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2FE3sJB Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2FDEbiA Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2FHCzVe Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2FFx4Gi Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2FEbDWi
Views: 344335 The Economist
13 Curvy Girl Fashion Hacks and DIY Outfit Ideas
 
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Hey all you curvy girls out there! We noticed there's only a few DIY videos about how to best accentuate your natural shape, so we answered your requests and made a video just for you. We know that finding the right fashion for your body is sometimes a struggle. If you have a curvy body, these life hacks will make your life easier! And don't forget to love yourself - you are beautiful just the way you are! Subscribe to Crafty Panda channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC03R... Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/craftypanda Visit Bored Panda website: https://www.boredpanda.com Puking Rainbow iPhone Case: https://shop.boredpanda.com/products/... Sleeping Panda Pillow: https://shop.boredpanda.com/products/... Loved the music used in this video? We find our music on EpidemicSound: https://bit.ly/2JcUlBa For sponsored content contact us at [email protected]
Views: 11995309 Crafty Panda
Why Don't Birds on Power Lines Get Zapped?
 
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Skillshare is offering SciShow viewers two months of unlimited access to Skillshare for free! https://skl.sh/scishow-11 If you stick your finger in a socket, you’re in for a bad time, so how can birds perch on power lines without getting zapped? Hosted by: Olivia Gordon SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It's called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at https://www.scishowtangents.org ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: rokoko, Alex Hackman, Andrew Finley Brenan, Lazarus G, Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, الخليفي سلطان, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.explainthatstuff.com/electricity.html https://alum.mit.edu/slice/how-do-birds-sit-power-lines-without-getting-electrocuted http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0300985816646431 https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2005/07/why-are-power-lines-so-dangerous.html https://www.eagles.org/take-action/avian-friendly-power-lines/ https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0101565 http://megaanswers.com/why-does-water-conduct-electricity-while-air-does-not/
Views: 163349 SciShow
The world in 2050: Megachange | The Economist
 
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Daniel Franklin, executive editor of The Economist and editor of "The World in..." examines megatrends across four main areas: "people", "life and death", "economy and business" and "knowledge", at The Economist's Ideas Economy: Innovation 2012 event in Berkeley, California. Subscribe NOW to The Economist: http://econ.st/1Fsu2Vj Get more The Economist Follow us: https://twitter.com/TheEconomist Like us: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist View photos: https://instagram.com/theeconomist/ The Economist videos give authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
Views: 42470 The Economist
The High Cost of Our Cheap Fashion | Maxine Bédat | TEDxPiscataquaRiver
 
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Do you know where your clothes come from? The apparel industry is one of the biggest violators of both the environment and human rights. In this compelling and information-packed talk, co-founder of Zady Maxine Bédat shows how you can take back the power of your wardrobe, and feel better in (and better about) your clothes. Maxine Bédat is the co-founder and CEO of Zady, a fashion brand and lifestyle destination creating a transparent and sustainable future for the $1.5 trillion apparel industry. Her background in international law and diplomacy, including serving as a legal clerk for the U.N., led her to found The Bootstrap Project, a non-profit organization that works with entrepreneurs in the developing world. For its work in sustainability, Zady was named one of the world’s “Most Innovative Companies” in retail by Fast Company and its creativity was recognized by Mashable, which called the company “the #1 business rocking content marketing.” Bédat serves on the Council of NationSwell, has spoken at some of the world’s leading conferences, including the WWD Apparel/Retail CEO Summit, and has been regularly featured as an expert by Bloomberg, Forbes, Business of Fashion, CNN and the Huffington Post. Bédat is a graduate of Columbia Law School. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 69841 TEDx Talks
Why do languages die? | The Economist
 
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There are more than 7,000 languages. The number of people speaking English, Spanish and Mandarin continues to grow, but every fortnight a langauge will disappear forever. The Economist's language expert Lane Greene explains why. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Irankarapte iishu Dydh Da I don't speak those languages. In fact very few people do. They're used only by a handful of people, and all those languages are in danger of extinction. There are more than 7,000 languages spoken in the world today but about 1/3 of those have fewer than 1000 speakers and according to UNESCO more than 40% of those languages are in danger of extinction. In fact every fortnight one of the world's languages disappears forever. When you say dead language many people think of Latin, but Latin actually never died it's been spoken continuously since the time of the Caesars, but it changed very gradually over 2,000 years until it became French, Spanish, and other Romance languages. True language death happens when communities switched to other languages and parents stopped raising their children to speak their old ones. Then the last elderly speaker dies the language is unlikely ever to be spoken fluently again. If you look at this chart which measures the world's languages in terms of their size and their state of health you can see that most languages are ranked in the middle. English like just a few other dominant languages is up at the top left hand corner it's in a really strong state but if your language is down here in the bottom right hand corner of the graph like Kayupulau from Indonesia or Kuruaya from Brazil you are in serious trouble. In the bad old days governments just banned languages they didn't like but sometimes the pressure is more subtle. Any teenager growing up in the Soviet Union soon realized that whatever language you spoke at home, mastering Russian was going to be the key to success. Citizens of China including Tibetans as well as speakers of Shanghainese or Cantonese face similar pressure today to focus on Mandarin. Once the language is gone well it usually goes the way of the dodo - just one language has ever come back from the dead - Hebrew. It was extinct for two millennia but Jewish settlers to Palestine in the early 20th centuries spoke different languages back in Europe and they adopted Hebrew on their arrival as their common language. It became Israel's official language when the country was fully established in 1948 and now has seven million speakers. Now Hebrew is the world's only fully revived language but others are trying. Cornish, spoken in southwestern England, died out two centuries ago but today there are several hundred speakers of the revived language. Practicality aside human diversity is a good thing in its own right. Imagine going on an exciting holiday only to find that the food, clothing, buildings, the people and yes the language was just the same as back home. Oliver Wendell Holmes put it well "every language is a temple in which the soul of those who speak it is enshrined". Moving that soul of the people from a temple into a museum just isn't the same thing. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 40165 The Economist
Mapping poverty in America | The Economist
 
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America is the richest country in the world, but it also has one of the biggest divides between rich and poor. What can a zip code reveal about inequality? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy The United States is the world's richest country. It is also one of the most unequal. 40 million people live in poverty - that's around 12% of the population. It has the highest poverty rate in the rich world and three men own as much wealth as the bottom half of the population. The good news is that poverty has decreased over the past two years but income inequality has increased, resulting in a growing gap between the rich and the poor. Although the cost of living varies from state to state, the poverty line is currently set at an annual household income of $25,100 for a family of four. The wealthiest states are coastal, with the south having a higher concentration of poorer States. In Mississippi around 20% of people live below the poverty line. That's the highest percentage of any state in the country. In New Hampshire it's less than half that. California and Missouri have around the same percentage. Whereas poverty in neighboring Virginia and West Virginia is poles apart. Poverty rates can wildly vary between towns within states. Take Paris, Texas, which has a rate of 41% while in neighboring Reno it's just 3%. The wealth divide can also be seen fluctuating between blocks and even streets. In different blocks on separate sides of Ocean Parkway in Brooklyn, New York, the poverty rate is six times that of the other. Poverty in America is not only geographical, it's also racial. African-Americans are more than twice as likely to live in poverty than white Americans, but it's Native Americans who have the highest poverty rate of any race in the country, and this is even higher for those who live on reservations. Poverty declined in the majority of states in 2017 . Income growth, welfare programs, and more jobs have led to the decline - but if the incomes of the top 1% continued to grow faster than those of the other 99%, the gap between the rich and the poor will continue to widen. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2o8kfOB Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2o8kglD Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2o8khpH Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2o8khWJ Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2o8kitL
Views: 50883 The Economist
The future of fashion | The Economist
 
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The fashion industry is on the verge of a tech revolution. Clothes of tomorrow could be designed, fitted and sold to us by technology alone. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy From Gucci to Chanel, Topshop to Primark - Clothes industry heavyweights rely on fashion forecasters for next season's new look. But advancements in artificial intelligence are about to turn their art into a science. Cognitive computing is now able to identify patterns previously inaccessible to humans. It can simultaneously analyse vast amounts of global data - from social media buzz to political polls - making it possible to accurately spot what's hot and what's not. WGSN, the world's biggest fashion forecaster. now uses AI alongside more traditional methods. A move that could reduce forecasting errors by up to 50%. Trend-spotting mistakes can have far-reaching consequences. H&M recently confessed to a $4.3 billion unsold stock mountain. Industry waste costs both profits and reputation. Technology could make the fashion industry more sustainable. By using machine learning, an AI technique, to match supply with demand unnecessary manufacturing could be limited and fashions environmental footprint reduced. Online retailers are cottoning on. In the next two years 75% of fashion retailers plan to invest in AI. But keeping up with tech giants is going to be tough. Amazon is now developing what's believed to be the world's first AI fashion designer. It plans to use an algorithm that designs clothes by analyzing images and copying popular styles - using them to build completely new designs. This technological makeover could hold huge benefits especially for those who like to shop online. A Japanese company has unveiled the Zozo, a body measurement suit that will ensure the clothes you order fits you perfectly. All meaning our future wardrobes could contain clothes designed for us and sold to us by technology alone. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 10987 The Economist
The Democrats in the age of Trump | The Economist
 
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Since Donald Trump entered politics the Democrats have struggled to compete. The mid-term elections will see them employing a change in tactics that they hope will mobilise new voters and win over disillusioned moderates. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy It's being called the most important midterm election in American history. On November 6th Americans will vote for the first time since Donald Trump won the presidency. The Republicans control both houses of Congress - the midterms provide the Democrats with a chance of clawing back some political control. If the Democrats come up short they face another cycle shut out of power. The result of these midterms could shape America, and its political parties, for decades to come. Max Rose is running for Congress. Like Mr. Trump, Mr. Rose is an unusual figure. He's a military veteran who prides himself on not being a career politician. The success of Donald Trump has forced the Democrats to cast a wider net supporting first-time candidates with diverse backgrounds. Among them a record number of women and non-white candidates, but also many military veterans. The Republicans have long claimed that they are the party of the military. But now the Democrats are harnessing military patriotism too. This is a different breed of Democrat. In many cases they're running against career politicians. Mr. rose was inspired by the fresh approach of Mr. Trump's vision for the country but feels let down. Republicans already hold the house in the Senate. The Democrats stand little chance of winning the Senate, but with this new breed of candidate they could take control of the house. Failure would leave them unable to check president Trump's power. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 46187 The Economist
University: does a degree pay? | The Economist
 
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The pressure for school-leavers to get a university degree is rising across the world. But does further education lead to better pay and opportunities? Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Is university worth it? Many believe further education is the key to success. Around half of school leavers in the rich world have degrees and the share in rising in poorer countries. Governments say it boosts social mobility and economic growth. In South Korea 70% of young workers are graduates, up from 37% in 2000 but half the country's unemployed have degrees. Globally students pay huge tuition fees at a time when they could be earning. In America students spend about $30,000 a year on fees and lose out on $60,000 of wages during a four-year course. The educational bar has been raise for everyone accessing jobs. Degrees are now demanded for jobs that once didn't need them. In 1970, 16% of registered nurses in America had bachelor degrees. By 2015 that number had grown to 60%. Yet the rise in the number of degrees has not led to higher pay for all. Of the professions that have increased their number of graduates over the past 50 years nearly half have seen wages fall in real terms and the future is uncertain. AI will disrupt the jobs market. The rise of short, work-focused courses in fast-growing fields, such as IT, would provide life-long training for all workers. Currently young people are ill-served by expensive degrees. It is time for a radically different approach. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 59765 The Economist
Chemtrails | The Conspiracy Files
 
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While we might not think twice about the plumes of water vapour planes make in the sky, could it be possible they actually contain dangerous chemicals used to control the population as well as the environment? Today we’ll investigate the Chemtrail theory, to see if there’s any truth in these claims. It’s time to open The Conspiracy Files… Don't forget to Subscribe for more Conspiracies! - http://bit.ly/1dmVsvF A massive thank you to our super fans who have supported us on our Patreon page. Feel free to take a look at the rewards we have on offer for our supporters here: https://www.patreon.com/alltimeconspiracies?ty=h Like us on Facebook - http://on.fb.me/1eWsxhV Join us on Snapchat - https://www.snapchat.com/add/atconspiracies Follow us on Twitter - http://bit.ly/MNqFgY FAQ's: What editing software do we use?: http://amzn.to/2p8Y4G2 What mic do we use for our voice overs?: http://amzn.to/2pbWBzr What camera do we use to film?: http://amzn.to/2pbMv1A What computer do we edit on?: http://amzn.to/2p951qu
Views: 24138 Alltime Conspiracies
Gus Dapperton: Normalizing Individuality
 
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Twitter: https://twitter.com/RenshawHS Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/renshawhs/ Talking about one of my favorite up and coming musicians! He doesn't have too much music out, but you should still check him out! Who should I talk about next???
Views: 164310 Alfo Media
How to fuel the future | The Economist
 
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America, under President Donald Trump, is securing its “energy independence” with oil and gas. But unlike fossil fuels, renewables will not increase global warming —and China is moving fast. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Oil moves the world around and creates powerful countries. Oil is such a vital commodity that it provoked wars throughout the 20th century. The few countries that produce it, try to keep control of it to ensure its riches stay at home. Those who do not have it, strive to get it. In the 1930s Saudi Arabia was one of the poorest countries in the world but the discovery of oil transformed it and Saudi Arabia has amassed $515.6 billion in sovereign wealth funds. It has become the linchpin of a powerful cartel that sometimes rations oil to push up prices. The United States is now the biggest producer of oil and gas owing to its shale revolution. It has tapped abundant reserves through fracking - a technology that uses high-pressure water and sand to fracture rock deep below the ground to extract hydrocarbons. This shale revolution has helped the United States become less dependent on oil imported from Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Iraq, and other OPEC countries. More oil and gas on global markets has also benefited the world's energy consumers by pushing down costs. Oil still remains the primary fuel, supplying almost 1/3 of the world's energy but its heyday may soon be over, despite growing demand. By 2040 the world's global energy use is set to increase by 30 percent. That energy must be much cleaner if the world wants to prevent catastrophic global warming. In the past coal and gas were less expensive than renewable technology but their costs have come down dramatically. There is now a race among some nations to create more efficient renewable technologies to reduce pollution and be more energy self-sufficient. China is the world's largest consumer of coal and the second largest of oil but it also now leads the world in clean energy. one third of the world's new wind power and solar panels is installed in China, and it sells more electric cars than any other country. The quest for energy self-sufficiency is a big motivation for many countries. China is moving fast, and America under President Donald Trump, is securing its energy independence with oil and gas. But unlike oil and gas renewables will not increase global warming. The long term transition to clean energy will throw up new global challenges. It will create tensions in unstable parts of the Middle East as oil revenue starts to dry up. Another challenge is that wind and sun are intermittent. renewables may require vast shared electricity grids spanning boarders to make them more efficient. To stop global warming the world needs a huge collaboration over our shared energy future. If we fail, wars over scarce resources could be even worse in the 21st century than in the 20th. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 53675 The Economist
Understand your own mind and goals via bullet journaling | Ryder Carroll
 
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- Organizing your thoughts can help you plan and achieve goals that might otherwise seen unobtainable. - The Bullet Journal method, in particular, can reduce clutter in your life by helping you visualize your future. - One way to view your journal might be less of a narrative and more of a timeline of decisions. Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/bullet-journal-method-goals Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink When people ask me what the Bullet Journal method is I like to describe it as a mindfulness practice that’s disguised as a productivity system. So what sets Bullet Journal apart from regular list keeping and journaling? It’s not linear. So essentially you create these things called collections which are essentially lists or graphs or whatever you need of related information. So that could be a shopping list, it could be a to do list, it could be a project, it could be a fertility tracker, whatever you need it to be. And Bullet Journal lays a framework for you to have all these different components work with each other. And the way it does that is through simple mechanisms you already know – page numbers, page titles. So, for example, there’s an index and the index allows you to simply store all the different collections that you have in your notebook so you can quickly find them again. There are four core collections in the Bullet Journal. One is the daily log. It’s a way for us to capture all the thoughts that bubble up throughout the day and categorize them into tasks, events and notes using different symbols. So we keep our entries very short and then we also tag them essentially with an icon. Then we have this thing known as a monthly log. And the monthly log on one page is a monthly calendar and then on the next page is a monthly task list essentially where you can create a monthly inventory each month. You take a step back, think about what you want to get done that month. Anything that’s bubbled up and getting it out of your head and on paper. The calendar on the monthly log can be used in one of two ways. In a traditional way but I prefer to use it as a way to actually write down things after they happen. So the calendar quickly becomes a timeline of the decisions you made and the events that have happened essentially. And having the context of when what actually happened can be very revealing in its own right. Like did you actually start working out three weeks ago or a week and a half ago. Did you send that email then or what not. So it’s a timeline of highlights in your life. So you have the monthly log. Then you have the future log for all the things that happen outside of the current month. The Bullet Journal unfolds in real time so we don’t hoard pages. Essentially every time you flip a page it can accept pretty much anything that you need it to be it drawings, poetry, lists, projects, whatever you want. And the way that works is with the index. So every time you flip the page and you use it for a different purpose, you number your pages and then you list that page and its title in the index. So you have these four core collections. But you can create collections for pretty much anything you like. Again, shopping lists, vacation planning. Lists can be infinite pretty much. You can keep writing things down and whether or not you do them well, you know, that just depends on the person. What I found really important is that I keep reengaging with the things that I write down and keep curating the substance of my experience if you will. So we have the monthly log essentially. Every month we set up a new monthly log and in between the monthly logs you have the daily logs. And the daily logs are there to capture your tasks, events and notes. So at the end of each month what you do is you reflect over the last – so at the end of every month you reflect through the past month and see the things that you’ve done and the things that you haven’t done.
Views: 13654 Big Think
'GLASS SKIN' MAKEUP TUTORIAL
 
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Follow me on instagram here https://www.instagram.com/lisaeldridgemakeup/. X For all the products that are featured in this film click on the links below: 100% of advertising revenue is donated to charity. NuFace - Mini Facial Toning Device: http://lisae.me.uk/28614-28933 Kiehl’s - Calendula & Aloe Soothing Hydration Masque: http://lisae.me.uk/28934-28933 FOREO - UFO Mini Smart Mask: http://lisae.me.uk/28936-28933 FOREO - Make My Day UFO Activated Mask Facial Treatment: http://lisae.me.uk/28937-28933 Augustinus Bader - The Cream: http://lisae.me.uk/28849-28933 Chanel - Vitalumiere Aqua - 20: http://lisae.me.uk/13384-28933 Lumene - Instant Glow Beauty Serum - Light: http://lisae.me.uk/28939-28933 Charlotte Tilbury - Hollywood Flawless Filter : http://lisae.me.uk/28940-28933 By Terry - Nude Expert Duo Stick: http://lisae.me.uk/28941-28933 It's Skin - Power 10 Formula - PO Effector Face Serum: http://lisae.me.uk/28942-28933 ZOEVA - Face Shape Brush - 110: http://lisae.me.uk/26750-28933 Nars - Radiant Creamy Concealer - Custard: http://lisae.me.uk/25778-28933 ZOEVA - Luxe Crease - 228: http://lisae.me.uk/27859-28933 Danessa Myricks - Vision Flush - Sugar Plum: http://lisae.me.uk/28944-28933 Cass Art - Pro Art - Masterstroke Filbert - 0 : http://lisae.me.uk/27299-28933 Lancôme - Concealer Brush - 8: http://lisae.me.uk/26867-28933 Chanel - Natural Finish Loose Powder - Translucent: http://lisae.me.uk/7521-28933 Rae Morris - Invisible Mattifier: http://lisae.me.uk/28945-28933 Lord and Berry - Foundation Brush - 838: http://lisae.me.uk/28946-28933 Sigma - Medium Sweeper - E54: http://lisae.me.uk/28947-28933 Decorté - Lasting Gel Eyeliner - BL 901: http://lisae.me.uk/28949-28933 Sensai - Lash Volumiser 38°C Mascara - Black: http://lisae.me.uk/28950-28933 3INA - The Lip Primer: http://lisae.me.uk/28952-28933 Decorté - Lip Liner - BE821: http://lisae.me.uk/28953-28933 Clarins - Instant Light Lip Comfort Oil - Candy 04 http://lisae.me.uk/28954-28933 Cover FX - Shimmer Veil - Mercury: http://lisae.me.uk/28955-28933 Kit Stars - Tapered Blender - S31: http://lisae.me.uk/28957-28933 Valmont - Priming With A Hydrating Fluid: http://lisae.me.uk/27791-28933 On my nails is Chanel - Le Vernis - Rouge Noir : http://lisae.me.uk/21640-28933 The rings I’m wearing in my tutorial are: Lisa Eldridge - The Anderson: http://lisae.me.uk/28717-28933 Lisa Eldridge - The Betty: http://lisae.me.uk/28719-28933 Lisa Eldridge - The Meena: http://lisae.me.uk/28741-28933 For all the products used in this film and for makeup tips and information visit my site : http://www.lisae.me.uk/28933 Lisa Eldridge X Follow me on Snapchat THELISAELDRIDGE Follow me on Instagram http://instagram.com/LisaEldridgemakeup Follow me on Google+ https://www.google.com/+LisaEldridge Follow me on Twitter at http://twitter.com/Lisa_Eldridge Follow me on Facebook http://facebook.com/LisaEldridgeDotCom Follow me on Pinterest http://pinterest.com/lisaeldridge Disclaimer I can’t guarantee that all of the make-up and skincare products I recommend will suit you. I only use products I personally think are good having tried them on myself and my clients but everyone's skin is different and it's possible to be allergic to anything. Wherever possible, test products out on yourself before purchasing. I only feature products I like, or want to try. The products I use in these videos are either purchased by me or sent to me by make-up companies to use in my professional capacity as a make-up artist for fashion and celebrity photo shoots, red carpet etc. I am also sent products by many of the top magazines to judge for awards. I do not accept payment and am not sponsored to make any of the films on this channel. Some of the links under the videos and blog posts on my site are affiliated however and as stated before, I only feature products I like, or want to try. For the my full policy click here - http://www.lisaeldridge.com/info/
Views: 447246 Lisa Eldridge
The economics of immigration
 
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Immigration is the most divisive issue in the world. Lou takes a look at the topic from an economic perspective: How do immigrants impact the job market? Do they stymie growth, or contribute to it? Do they take more benefits then they pay into the system? SOURCES & FURTHER READING Peri on the economic impact of immigration https://clas.berkeley.edu/research/immigration-economic-benefits-immigration Borjas on the economic pros and cons of immigration https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/09/trump-clinton-immigration-economy-unemployment-jobs-214216 Camarota on the case against immigration https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2017-03-31/case-against-immigration The immigration economy (Council of Foreign Relations roundup) https://www.cfr.org/expert-roundup/immigration-economy CREDITS Writer: Louis Foglia Editor: m.cho Researcher: Dushyant Naresh Supervising Producer: Allison Brown Follow Beme on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bemenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/bemeapp Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/officialbeme/
Views: 48361 BEME News
Theresa May's Brexit Monsters, cartooned | The Economist
 
02:08
As the British Prime Minister finally puts forward her contentious draft Brexit plan this week, Kal, our cartoonist, illustrates the potentially monstrous consequences. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Ever since I was a little boy I enjoy drawing monsters. I would spend ages assembling fangs, eyes, scales and horns into the creative critters of my imagination. This week in my cartoon for the Economist, I was able to put my youthful zeal for beasts to good use. I wanted to create two toothy cartoon abominations to help explain the uncomfortable choices facing Britain in the fast-approaching run-up to brexit next spring. The British prime minister Theresa May this week finally put forward a draft brexit plan for the UK. It was a 500-page Colossus that received mixed reviews from her cabinet. It faces even tougher scrutiny in Parliament - which will have to approve it. When the public faces this brexit behemoth they will see a scary creature that will leave damaging tooth marks on many parts of the economy. A worse option for brexit may be looming - a No Deal brexit monster. A failure to agree on Mrs Mays deal by March could unleash this fiend with even more ferocious bite. Surely there must be a way to escape these groups you may ask? Well, not according to Mrs May and many of her fellow conservatives - they say a second referendum on Brexit is out of the question. Asking the citizens to vote again on this weighty issue would, they claim, unleash even more monstrous consequences. Is the door an escape or a trap? There's only one way to find out. What lies behind the door? We don't know Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: https://econ.st/2o8kfOB Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://econ.st/2o8kglD Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://econ.st/2o8khpH Follow us on Instagram: https://econ.st/2o8khWJ Follow us on Medium: https://econ.st/2o8kitL
Views: 23199 The Economist
How cringe-worthy is that tweet? Behold, 'the ratio'
 
01:52
When a tweet gets more "replies" than "retweets" or "likes," it isn't necessarily a good thing. Read more: https://wapo.st/2DISupt. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2qiJ4dy Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonpost/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/
Views: 1973 Washington Post
Plastic pollution: is it really that bad? | The Economist
 
02:36
Nine in ten Europeans worry about plastic’s impact on the environment. But plastic is not the worst offender when compared to other kinds of pollution
Views: 53117 The Economist
7 Ways Women Wished MEN Would Stop Dressing
 
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Check out Sloane undershirts here: https://goo.gl/CnTU6c Use code JOSE25 for a 25% discount! Check out the WORLD'S BEST T-shirts: https://www.esntls.co/ Pick one up and let me know what you think! Subscribe to our 2nd channel: http://bit.ly/2aOthqV Thank you to Sloane for sponsoring this video! FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Website: http://teachingmensfashion.com/ Snapchat: Joseczuniga Instagram: http://bit.ly/2ejnsFf Email: [email protected] Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hiqMS4 Twitter: http://bit.ly/2hirC19 Our Address is: 10380 SW Village Center Dr., 240 Port St. Lucie, FL 34987 Music by: https://soundcloud.com/lakeyinspired & https://soundcloud.com/dyallas
Views: 328552 Teachingmensfashion
7 MEN'S FASHION RULES Every Guy Should Follow (For Beginners) | Alex Costa
 
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Click http://bit.ly/2Q7amNf for amazing custom dress shirts AlexCosta40 for 40% off 1 tailored shirt for new customers ● MY FREE NEWSLETTER - http://bit.ly/2JlJmcX ● FOLLOW MY INSTAGRAM - https://goo.gl/jmK8if ● SUBSCRIBE TO ALEX COSTA - https://goo.gl/RQdFEH ● LEVEL UP COMMUNITY - https://goo.gl/EuK3c6 ● TWITTER - https://goo.gl/ML7aaw Topic of discussion: which of of these men's fashion rules do you break? I know that a lot of you guys who watch my videos are just now getting into fashion. Maybe you found me through a video about grooming or hairstyle, but now you want to make sure that your outfits are on point too. So today, you're gonna learn 7 Men's Fashion Rules that Every Guy Should Follow AlexCosta40 for 40% off 1 tailored shirt for existing customers Size.Me App: (Apple) https://apple.co/2SFeUvY Android: http://bit.ly/2ET4ohR Check out my other videos: Men's Outfit Inspiration Summer Fashion 2018: https://goo.gl/r3NzXQ 3 Easy Spring Outfits for Men 2018: https://goo.gl/rqZR6g 8 Things Men Should do Everyday: https://goo.gl/W9wDVx My Morning Routine 2018: https://goo.gl/a4nWj3 Healthy Hair Tips For Men: https://goo.gl/M1YiZj 5 Shoes Every Guy Needs to Own: https://goo.gl/Npjv9D 4 Easy Winter Outfits for Men: https://goo.gl/HQGXcX 7 MEN'S FASHION RULES Every Guy Should Follow Beginner's men's fashion rules Fashion Rules Every Guy Should Follow On my channel you will find videos about men's fashion, men's hair, health, fitness, overall lifestyle, and of course, my personal life. This includes my friends and family, so please be mindful of that and maintain a positive atmosphere in the comments section. Don't forget to subscribe and make sure to hit that like button if you enjoyed the video! Thank you to Tailor Store for sponsoring this video.
Views: 214730 Alex Costa
Why You MUST Try Native American Cuisine | AJ+
 
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Native American cuisine is America's original food, dating back some 10,000 years. So why don't we see Native restaurants on every street corner in the U.S.? Yara went on a road trip through the American Southwest to find out. PRESENTER/PRODUCER: Yara Elmjouie SENIOR PRODUCER: Tabish Talib PRODUCER: Adrienne Blaine EXECUTIVE PRODUCER: Ethar El-Katatney EDITORS: Yara Elmjouie, Tabish Talib ANIMATOR: Zeino (https://www.youtube.com/zeino) CAMERA: Tabish Talib, Yara Elmjouie COLOR & SOUND MIXING: Ahmad Asaad STORY CONSULTANT: Tasha Hauff BRANDING/LOGO: Mohammad Aklik, Mohammad Kakhi Subscribe for more videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm3T-XAgVhKH9jT0ViRg?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus
Views: 11960 AJ+
Fast Fashion Is Disgusting (you need to stop shopping at fashion nova, zara, and primark)
 
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This is a video that I've need to make for a long time. And I'm happy it's coming out now! Throughout my time on Youtube I've shit on fast fashion brands without giving a real explanation, so here it is. This video is not meant to attack anyone, it's rather just me showing you guys something that you might not have known about how your clothes are made. Hopefully, we can change the way fashion currently works and with just a little bit of work and being defiant, I think it's possible. Social Media: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hautelemode/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/HauteLeMode Tumblr: http://hautelemode.tumblr.com Music: https://soundcloud.com/user-817107625/isodoped A Few Sustainable Online Stores: https://lisasaysgah.com/ https://www.patagonia.com/home/ https://wearpact.com/ https://www.everlane.com/ https://www.thereformation.com/ https://www.ravenandlily.com/ http://www.susanalexandra.com/ https://rachelantonoff.com/ https://shopthebreak.com/ https://mirth.co/collections/new-arrivals https://karastore.com/ https://ciaolucia.com/ http://www.veja-store.com/ Fast Fashion is Disgusting Sources: The Fashion Law: http://www.thefashionlaw.com/learn/fast-fashions-green-initiatives-dont-believe-the-hype The True Cost Documentary nature.com: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-017-0058-9 Vijayawada Photo Factory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uslx0Mxn-E8 Weaving: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbNl_nYI5qc Nitrogen Fertilizers: http://www.cropnutrition.com/the-facts-nitrogen-fertilizer Mills Abuse: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/jan/04/workers-held-captive-indian-mills-supplying-hugo-boss Health Problems From Mills: https://www.lawyernc.com/legal-services/workers-compensation-lawyer/common-workplace-injuries/textile-mill-employees/ Hugo Boss Slavery in Mills: https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/jan/04/workers-held-captive-indian-mills-supplying-hugo-boss History of Child Labor in United States (Mills): https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2017/article/history-of-child-labor-in-the-united-states-part-1.htm Dyes and Their Health: https://www.trustedclothes.com/blog/2016/06/21/dyes-and-their-effects-on-your-health/ Dyes and Pollution: https://www.trustedclothes.com/blog/2016/06/23/impact-of-dyes/ Fast Fashion Design Thievery: https://www.vox.com/2018/4/27/17281022/fashion-brands-knockoffs-copyright-stolen-designs-old-navy-zara-h-and-m
Views: 229481 HauteLeMode
BOAT LIFE: A Day in the Life
 
13:40
Welcome to another special episode of boat life. Today we're showing you a day in the life here onboard La Vagabonde. It's been a while since we gave you a glimpse into our average day! So we fired up the cameras bright and early this morning to take you along for a sail, spearfish, a bit of work and cooking. I had a ball making this episode for you guys!! So I hope you enjoy it 😊 Love Elayna (and Riles). Song Credits: 00:15 Wake Up - Adam Yoo https://soundcloud.com/adamyoo_music 01:51 Luís Trindade - Gods https://luistrindade.bandcamp.com/ 04:45 Cold Shoulder - The Fabric https://thefabric.bandcamp.com/ 07:14 Hugo - Slow Burning in a Dancing Room https://hugocottu.bandcamp.com Videos made by Elayna, starring Riley!! https://www.instagram.com/elayna.carausu https://www.instagram.com/riley.whitelum Don't forget to like us on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/sailinglavagabonde Want the chance to come aboard/unseen footage privileges? Please become a Patron and support our production! http://www.patreon.com/LaVagabonde Download Elaynas music here! https://elaynac.bandcamp.com Pick up some official La Vaga merch and help support our journey! http://shop-lavagabonde.com Subscribe to our new sexy website for blog posts and updates! http://www.sailing-lavagabonde.com Follow us on Twitter! http://twitter.com/@sailing_lavaga Like Elaynas Music page on the book! http://www.facebook.com/elaynacmusic FAQ What cameras do we use? BIG CAMERA: http://amzn.to/1t6fAfY OTHER BIG CAMERA: http://amzn.to/2rybQE2 HANDY CAM: http://amzn.to/25KvT0x GOPRO: http://amzn.to/1t6haPc DRONE: http://amzn.to/2ooXPLs SELFIE STICK: http://bit.ly/Spivostick What software do we use? Premiere Pro Predict Wind http://bit.ly/PredictWindNZ
Views: 277985 Sailing La Vagabonde
How To Start A Tech-Friendly Church In San Francisco
 
06:05
The Bay Area has the least churchgoing population in the United States. But there's a group of religious leaders out to change that. They're creating modern, hip and tech-friendly churches across the Bay Area, and adopting business principles as they consider how to build successful "start-up churches" and grow the religious community. The San Francisco Bay Area is home to the least churchgoing population in the United States. According to the Barna Research Group, 61% of residents do not attend church. But there's a group of religious leaders and savvy businesspeople out to change that. The Exponential Conference recently came to the Bay Area for the second year in a row. This gathering is meant to catalyze evangelical Christian leaders to start new churches. It's a practice called "church planting" and the goal of the conference, as the name suggests, is the exponential growth of the religious community. Turns out, building up a successful congregation in the Bay Area involves detailed business plans, sleek websites, intentional social media branding, podcasts of sermons, and lots of upbeat Christian rock. VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger is the Chairman of the Board at a group called Transforming the Bay with Christ. This coalition of business leaders, venture capitalists, non-profit leaders and pastors aims to convert one million people over the next decade. In order to so, it hopes to raise $15 million for what it calls it's Start-up Church Fund. Gelsinger donates nearly half his annual income to charity, much of it directed to church planting organizations. As Gelsinger says about his dual roles, "I'm the full time minister of VMWare and I have 23,000 souls that are under my leadership." » Subscribe to CNBC: http://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Google+: http://cnb.cx/PlusCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: http://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC #CNBC What It Takes To Get Bay Area Residents To Church
Views: 5756 CNBC
DW Live – World News & Current Affairs from the Heart of Europe
 
00:00
International news in English 24/7. DW Live provides world news and current affairs from the heart of Europe across the globe. DW English is the flagship channel for Germany's international broadcaster – made in Germany, made for minds. Subscribe for more - https://www.youtube.com/dwenglish?sub_confirmation=1 Visit our website - http://www.dw.com/ The latest News on Twitter - http://twitter.com/dwnews Join the discussion on Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/deutschewellenews
Views: 3192503 DW English
5 Outfits You Can Wear To Get Your Crush to Like You | Clothing Women Love To see Men In!
 
05:44
Check out MVMT watches here: https://www.mvmt.com/tmfashion Use Code: TMFASHION to get a special discount at checkout! Check out the WORLD'S BEST T-shirts: https://www.esntls.co/ Pick one up and let me know what you think! Subscribe to our 2nd channel: http://bit.ly/2aOthqV Thank you to MVMT for sponsoring this video! FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Website: http://teachingmensfashion.com/ Snapchat: Joseczuniga Instagram: http://bit.ly/2ejnsFf Email: [email protected] Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hiqMS4 Twitter: http://bit.ly/2hirC19 Our Address is: 10380 SW Village Center Dr., 240 Port St. Lucie, FL 34987 Music by: https://soundcloud.com/lakeyinspired & https://soundcloud.com/dyallas
Views: 378332 Teachingmensfashion
SHOPPING FOR CLASSIC PIECES - Questions To Ask Yourself Before Buying
 
11:12
SHOPPING FOR CLASSIC PIECES - Questions To Ask Yourself Before Buying - (LINKS BELOW). In this video (not sponsored), I share with you the questions to ask yourself before buying classic French Chic pieces, so that you enjoy them for years to come. Please WATCH this video to discover more. Bonjour, I am Marie-Anne Lecoeur, Amazon best-selling author of 'How to be Chic & Elegant' and 'The Tidy Closet', and founder of The French Chic Academy. https://www.howtobechicandelegant.com http://www.marieannelecoeur.com WHAT I'M WEARING* (some affiliate links) - Striped SWEATER from Zara from a few years ago - WATCH from Native Collection from Nordgreen (Receive a special 15% discount with the code MARIE at the basket when you order from https://nordgreen.co.uk/) https://nordgreen.com/collections/native-womens-watches/products/native-silver-mesh - Navy Saint James PEACOAT from Cot & Mer boutique in Cherbourg https://www.saint-james.com/us/ - LIPSTICK Bourjois: Rouge Edition Velvet 01 Personne Ne Rouge https://amzn.to/2CK8Qhj VIDEOS ABOUT CLASSICS & SHOPPING SHOPPING IN FRANCE⎢ 2 Saint James Pieces For My French Chic Wardrobe https://youtu.be/f_5IWScshK0 THREE CLASSIC & CHIC PIECES That Go With Everything! https://youtu.be/cCoIrq7xvAU Why a Classic Wardrobe SAVES YOU MONEY ⎢French Chic https://youtu.be/g_TH6bcnH8w A French Woman 's CLASSIC Wardrobe https://youtu.be/RAQ20u3_iGI EBOOK: HOW TO BE CHIC & ELEGANT (2016 EDITION) https://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/books1.html PAPERBACK: HOW TO BE CHIC & ELEGANT (2013 EDITION)* https://amzn.to/2S5Ilah FRENCH CHIC ECOURSES https://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/ecourses.html A TOUCH OF CLASS-IC (BRAND NEW!) https://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/a-touch-of-class-ic.html SHOP LIKE A CHIC FRENCH WOMAN https://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/shop-like-a-chic-french-woman.html FROM FRUMPY TO CHIC https://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/from-frumpy-to-chic.html DRESS 10LBS THINNER http://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/dress-10-lbs-thinner.html LOOK 10 YEARS YOUNGER http://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/look-10-years-younger.html FRENCH CHIC PLUS SIZE http://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/french-chic-plus-size.html WEAR COLOURS LIKE A FRENCH WOMAN http://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/wear-colours-like-a-french-woman.html HOW TO WEAR PRINTS http://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/how-to-wear-prints.html MINIMISE A BIG TUMMY http://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/minimise-a-big-tummy.html FRENCH CHIC PETITE http://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/french-chic-petite.html FRENCH CHIC DAILY https://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/french-chic-daily.html BODY SHAPES ecourses https://bit.ly/2NZQoXg FREE SHAPE UP! ECOURSE: Two simple ways to help you determine your body shape https://www.howtobechicandelegant.com/shape-up-ecourse.html * Some affiliate links are used above, whereby I earn a small commission from any sale but you don't pay more for this. Thank you for supporting my YouTube channel. Please SUBSCRIBE to my YouTube channel and click on the little bell for notifications, merci 😁 Marie-Anne x
Views: 6787 Marie-Anne Lecoeur

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